PRAISE FOR A PRE-WAR ALVIS

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* * * PRAISE FOR A PRE-WAR ALVIS

Sir,

It is with great interest that I have read of the misfortunes and disappointments which have befallen so many of your readers who have invested large bags of gold in post-war cars ranging in price from f600-£6,000.

It therefore gives me satisfaction to record that my 12/70 Alvis saloon, fabricated in 1939 and purchased 16 months ago, has given no trouble whatever. The speedo records 88.000, and the engine was bored and bearings tightened (but crank not ground) over 40,000 miles ago.

Oil consumption, silence, etc., are still reasonable, and it is 20,000 miles since 1 de-coked the car, the signs being that further disturbance is unnecessary at present.

At least once a week the car does 150/200 miles per day on business apart from normal running.

The speedo needle can be pushed against the stop at 80 in slightly favourable conditions (your road test figure just over 78 m.p.h. max.) and 30 m.p.a. is obtainable if acceleration is sacrificed.

The Girling-Bendix brakes are fine when right, but patience. in adjustment is vital to keep them right.

Although the extreme smoothness and silence of the post-war car of equivalent quality are to a certain extent missing at this mileage, there are innumerable compensations which make such a purchase agreeable—not the least of which is the price.

Finally, the service given by its firm is excellent. I have no connection with the company. I am, Yours, etc.,

Linby, Notts. ” 12/70.” * * *