The Sprite's Suspension

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The Editor makes a point of keeping out of the printing works, because he does not profess to a knowledge of printing machinery. You might think, conversely, that printers would concentrate on printing, and not pretend to know more than the Editor about motor cars. But no—although in the Austin-Healey Sprite road-test the Editor twice referred to the rear suspension of this car as 0.25-elliptic, the printers changed this to 0.5-elliptic springing. This is painful to the Editor, who is fully aware that in this respect B.M.C.’s Chief Engineer is wisely following a doctrine laid down by the great Georges Roesch, who specified 0.25-elliptic springs to support the back-end of his far-larger Talbots—in both cases the results are excellent. To the many readers who have written to hint expressing surprise that he didn’t know what sort of suspension a car he road-tested had, although having the audacity to attempt an analysis of it. the Editor wishes to proclaim publicly that he knows the Sprite has— let’s make sure its correct this time—quarter-elliptic back springs.
W. B.