The Oldest Bull-Nose

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At a time when the Government is attempting to belittle the older vehicles it was a splendid idea on the part of the Daily Express to organise a competition which drew public attention to the interest and serviceability of really old cars, even if the result was rather a foregone conclusion. We refer to the prize of a new Morris Minor 1000 offered to the person owning the Oldest Bull-Nose Morris. The winner out of 76 entrants was Frank Wootton, who bought his well known 1913 two-seater for £100 in 1951, as recorded in MOTOR SPORT shortly after his purchase. Second prize went to A. Evans’ 1916 saloon, the car discovered in Leeds a few years ago by N. Routledge, and third prize to N. Broome’s 1917 two-seater. This is interesting, because at least one more 1916 Morris-Cowley and two more 1913 Morris-Oxfords are known to the Veteran Car Club.

The rules sensibly specified, however, that cars must be in regular use and not owned or used by the Motor Trade. The three winning cars were taken to Cowley, where Lord Nuffield inspected them as they stood in a car park where once an early Morris workshop existed. The Judges were Mr. Bishop of the Nuffield Organisation, Lytton Jarman of the Bull-Nose Morris Club, D. C. Field of the V.C.C.. H. V. Organ, the longest-serving Morris employee. and F. Goldsworthy of the Daily Express. The prizes were presented on October 1st at the Bull-Nose Morris Club Rally in Woburn Park.—W. B.

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