SLOW PROGRESS

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SLOW PROGRESS

While doing some research into pre-war motor racing the Editor Caine upon certain news items which form a grave reminder of how ancient are many of the. arterial roads which we proclaim as modern and how long-delayed road improvement schemes have been. For instance. the Great West Road running out of London at Chiswick was formerly a dangerous single-track road, which was turned into a dual carriageway in 1938 and remains today at it was then, over 20 years ago.

Also in 1938 the authorities hind just woken up to the fact that the Kingston By-pass should be reconstructed as a twin-track road and only this year has this busy road been provided with its single underpass. In 1921 Viscount Peel, the then Minister of Transport, initiated the dual carriageway from London to Southend; by 1938 this was nearing completion! Last month a sunny Sunday proved this road to he inadequate for modern traffic., which formed a very long stationary queue on the roads ” Clearway ” ! The dual section of the Miekleham By-pass in Surrey dates back to the spring of 1938. What really is a disgrace is the fact that only now is the Staines By-pass, the route of which was decided on at a public enquiry at the end of February 1938, being built. In 1938 this was declared an urgent trunk road, to be paid for in entirety out of the Road Fund, the estimated cost then being £400,000. It was to run for 44 miles, from the junction of the Great West Road and Stanwell Road at East Bedfont, continuing through West Bedfont, skirting the north side of Staines reservoir, crossing the then G.W.R. line. and Moor Lane, to turn south and continue to the Egitam By-pass.

It is also a sheer disgrace that trafficon A30 is halted frequently at the Sunningdale level-crossing. In the late-vintage period the level-crossing Some miles, further on at Blackwater was bridged, yet that at Sunningdale remains, to cause delay and serious bunching of vehicles many times every day. Incidentally, in 1938 there were 4,560 railway level-crossings in this country, although in 1929 a Royal Commission had urged their complete abolition. How many have been bridged since ?—W. B.

SUNBEAM S.T.D. REGISTER SANDIHRST RALLY

The annual Sandhurst Rally with driving tests and CoacourS 4’ElegartOe will take place at the Royal Military Academy, Camberley, Surrey, on October 16th. Entry forms are available from Mrs. Winifred Boddy, Cannel, Wood Lane, Fleet, Hampshire.

JAGUAR D.C. IN THE MIDLANDS

The Jaguar Drivers’ Club have decided to revive the Midlands Section of the Club and a meeting has already heen held to discuss details. Potential new members should contact Rodney Crouch at 75, Baker Street, London. W.I.

RACE WHEELS FOR MINIS

After recent wheel failures of Mini ‘Minors and Austin Sevens in races the 11.M.C. Competitions Department at Abingdon-on-Thames, Berks, have introduced a special wheel for racing. These can be identified by a date stamp and the M.G. Octagon and the front wheels will Be stamped with the letters “SS.” R.A.C. scrutineers have been asked to pay special attention to wheel attachment bolts to see that they have not been over-tightened. The B.M.C. Competitions Department advise that Mini-Minor and Austin Seven wheel Outs should be tightened to 37.5 to 39.5 lb. ft. with a torque wrench. SS

-Angus H. Cundey will he pleased to hear from previous owners of his T.T.-Replica Frazer Nash, Reg. No. MV.3079 which competed in the Alpine Trial, T.T. and M.C.C. High Speed Trial in 1932. He would particularly like to discover early photographs and other data about this car. Another reader residing overseas is badly in need of a crown wheel and pinion for his completely refurbished 1929 Essex Challenger Six. Another reader has purchased a Frazer Nash, first registered in 1946, which has chassis No. C.L.1936/T.T.S. and engine No. 4ED.9752, the engine being the four-cylinder 14-litre Meadows. This reader is anxious to trace the car’s history. In both cases, letters can be forwarded.