Matters of moment, October 1964

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

The show

Another S.M.M.T. London Motor Exhibition opens at Earls Court on October 21st. Allis is an-annual happening which signals the close of the British motoring sport Season, the advent of shorter evenings, and the hazards of winter motoring. It is satisfactory that so many aspects of competition motoring have been very actively supported during 1964, from the intense technical exercise of Formula One, in which British supremacy in cars and drivers will in future have to withstand the efforts of Ferrari and Honda, to that remarkable spectacle, the International Drag Festival, which is currently in progress.

Such of the new ears which we are allowed to reveal are described in this issue, and next month there will be further significant releases. So, if this year’s Earls Court Show is not ‘a sensation, it should at least be a very satisfactory exhibition.

There will be the usual display of high-performance sports and GT cars. Rootes have brought automatic transmission into the sports-car field, B.M.C. have made history by installing an engine built by Crewe craftsmen into the rather old-fashioned Vanden Plas Princess, you can buy a 4-wheeler saloon in the cyclecar tradition for less than £400, in the form of the Fiat 500, and Reliant’s idea of what a true economy car should be, costing £525 (or a bit more than a de luxe B.M.C. Mini) is a car in something of the Old 7/17 Jowett and Citroen 2 c.v. tradition, inasmuch as the Tamworth firm favours a small engine in a roomy vehicle.

A.C. are marketing the big Ford engined Cobra in this country, and the keenly-anticipated N.S.U. Prinz 1000L is now established here, while the N.S.U. Wankel-powered Spider is no longer a static exhibit, having been sampled by the Press at Goodwood last month.

So there will be plenty of interest at Earls Court. Although cars on exhibition stands, amid all the artificial glitter and glare and swimsuited girls inseparable from any motor show, are seen in an unnatural setting, so that we prefer infinitely a GT Car cruising fast along some Continental motor-road, a rally saloon ascending an Alpine pass in a hurry, or any one of diverse sorts of competition cars racing round a circuit., there is no denying the attraction of Earls Court. Sooner or later almost everyone of importance in the motoring firmament goes there. The Show is a vast Social centre, where old friends and rivals of Industry meet and every aspect of the motor-car is discussed avidly, including models of an age and type not to be found on any of the manufacturers’ Stands.

Motor Sport with its good friend Motoring News will be on stand No. 4 at the 49th International Motor Show, Earls Court, Oct. 21st-31st.

The election

How many motorists will refrain from voting on polling day, fed up with inadequate roads, savage taxation, and continual persecution, remains to be seen. Vote for the Tories and you vote for Marples. Yet if the Conservative Party won’t look after the “car-owning class,” who will?

Lost causes

The Lost Causes Rally at Beaulieu on September 20th was open this year to defunct makes of any age. The Scottish class was supported by a lone 1927 Galloway which ignored both the parade and its prize.

The Birmingham class was the monopoly of no fewer than 18 B.S.A.s., 11 of which were mostly decrepit three-wheelers, the rest Scouts.

Nunn’s immaculate 1934 Railton took the Invicta/Railton class. The Jowett category was a close thing between a couple of 1953 Javelins, and a varied entry of Lanchesters produced a win for Miss Whitt’s 1933 Ten from Derby, and there was a tie in the Lea-Francis class between two P-type 12/40 2-seaters.

A 3-door tourer took the Trojan prize. The Wolverhampton contingent consisted of a Clyno 9 fabric saloon, a rather brassy Clyno 11, an A.J.S., and two smart Stars, the judges, F. Hutton-Stott, R. Hays and W. Boddy, awarding the prize to Warburton’s 1920 15.9 Star tourer.

Two very fine post-war Armstrong-Siddeley 18s just gave best to Wood’s 1936 bright yellow 20/25 saloon. In the miscellaneous class, a 1916 6.4-h.p. Perry was top car, but Ireland’s 1922 A.B.C. was judged to be the most meritorious “lost cause.”