2500S — Flagship of the Triumph range

Author

Bill Boddy

View profile
Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

At a time when Secretary for Trade Mr. Peter Shore was lecturing the country about buying British (although surely he should have been advocating trading in European cars since, by the edict of the people, Britain is a small parcel of the European continent?) it was a comforting feeling, in more senses than political, to be driving the new Triumph 2500S.

I was able to try this latest car, of a make which may well become British Leyland’s prestige product, in about as varied driving conditions as you will encounter in this Island during the summer months — Motorway cruising, dawdling along Shropshire lanes when we were early for a dinner date, twisting it in a hurry over the Welsh hills, negotiating heavy London snarl-ups, and inching it along in what I can only hope, for the sake of the good folk of Kent, was a record hold-up on the A21. This extended getting-to-know the new Triumph top-model was arranged by Ann Whitehouse, who looks after this section of BL Press services with notable efficiency.

What the Triumph design-team has done is to get rid of the never-really-trouble-free petrol-injection 2500PI engine and provide one using two SU HS6 carburetters to give, they claim, a car with the smoothness and silence of the old 2000TC, the performance of the 2500TC, and a little extra refinement of its own. It certainly seemed to me a very nice motor-car under the varied conditions, in which I used it. The engine is a long-stroke (74.7 x 95 mm.) six-cylinder of 2,498 c.c., giving 106 (DIN) b.h.p. at 4,700 r.p.m. but able to operate without anxiety up to 5,750 r.p.m. It is, let us agree, an old-style iron engine, with four main bearings and push-rod o.h.v. In this the BL policy is one of economy, as it is in scrapping fuel-injection, which may require correct servicing but which offers bonuses even on family-style cars in respect of fuel conservation and quick starting.

However, this old-fashioned Triumph Six starts very urgently if the manual choke is employed and it gives adequate performance in conjunction with a four-speed gearbox having overdrive on third and top. You can count on a top pace of around 105 m.p.h., which is mostly purely academic these days, and 0-60 m.p.h. step-off in 11 1/2 seconds.

The power is delivered smoothly and quietly, helped by good sound insulation, so that wind noise is more obtrusive than mechanical cacophony. The gears are changed by a substantial non-spring-loaded lever with long movements. It is a reasonably pleasant one to use unhurriedly, and the very convenient flick-switch for bringing in overdrive is on the lever’s knob. The clutch is rather heavy but smooth, the disc/drum servo single-circuit brakes also smooth, light and progressive. The central handbrake has an enormous grip and small movements.

Comfort is the key-note of this big Triumph. The seats are large and well padded, the steering column adjusts for rake, and there is ample ventilation from side eyeball and central adjustable fresh-air grilles. The trim is cloth, with simulated leather on the doors, and walnut cappings on doors and facia. Pile carpets, well fitted, add the required touch of luxury. There is a vintage look about the facia, with scattered instruments on a wood background. A clock, with seconds hand (why?) on the left is augmented by heat, voltage and fuel-level gauges and the matching, white-digit Smiths speedometer and tachometer. The circular Triumph warning-lights cluster and the rotary lamps’-switch extending from the steering-column are retained, as are the two control-stalks, the r.h. one working the turn-indicators. This one has the horn-button on its extremity but I prefer the horn switch to be on the steering wheel. All knobs are large and well symbolled, the three-spoke steering wheel has a leather-covered rim, quarter-lights are provided in the front doors, and the new 2500S looks every inch a Triumph, although the new-style cast-alloy wheels, shod on the test car with Michelin XAS tyres, and the new badge with emphasis on the “S”, single it out.

The all-independent coil-spring suspension gives an easy ride on normal roads and the power steering, if a little vague, allows three turns from lock-to-lock to he used, for quick response, with a small turning-circle. The engine does not belie its ancient ancestry unless well and truly extended and at 70 on a Motorway the engine speed drops to 2,650 r.p.m. if overdrive is engaged, a very restful pace. This overdrive also helps to give a good r.p.m. figure — over a big mileage I recorded 28.1 m.p.g. The fuel light remains on for a very long time before replenishing of the 14-gallon tank is necessary. The pedals are large but wide-spaced. The heater on the central console has sensible and nicely-contrived controls. Stowage is provided on under-facia shelves and in a lockable, wood-lidded cubby hole. The splines of the i.r.s. prove sticky when starting from rest and, perhaps peculiar to this particular car, irritations were a vibratory rear-view mirror, an external door mirror that was too loosely mounted, and water entering the boot and soaking the carpet if the Triumph was left out in heavy rain.

For those who appreciate a car of crisp Michelotti outward styling combined with a vintage specification and interior, the Triumph 2500S, at £3,353.22, should make its mark. The test car had tinted glass and a Triplex laminated windscreen and in some 1,300 miles I found it to give pleasurable motoring and to have had an oil thirst of almost nil. — W.B.

Related articles

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore

Related products

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore