Matters of moment, October 1985

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

The news that Renault is to wind up its F1 team at the end of this season has come no surprise. Indeed, with the State-owned company making massive losses last year and its F1 team relegated to the position of mid-field runners this year, it is hard to see what other decision could be taken.

One would have to be xenophobic to say goodbye to the team with any pleasure. For a major motor manufacturer to risk its reputation by entering Formula One at all is courageous and to do so while designing both chassis and engine is even more so and something which previously only Alfa Romeo, Mercedes-Benz and Honda had done in the post-war era. What made Renault’s effort even more creditable was not just that the team enjoyed several seasons of success but was done with a new form of technology, the turbo-charged engine.

Despite the fact that both the drivers’ and constructors’ championships eluded Renault, though Prost came so near to the title in 1983, it changed the face of the sport. Not only have we now an exclusively turbocharged formula but, unlike most successful manufacturers, Renault has made its engines available to other teams. While it may have been politic to supply Ligier, supplying Lotus and Tyrrell came with no strings, such as the insistence that French drivers must be employed. We might remember, too, that Renault did not necessarily take a chauvinist line when selecting its own drivers, as Derek Warwick has proved.

Formula One has been enriched by the presence of Renault and we feel that if ever a team morally deserved to take a championship, Renault is that team. There is little room for sentiment in F1 however, and the hard truth is that even though Renault enjoyed great success in the period 1980-83, the team was bogged down by bureaucracy (a word which is French in origin) and decision-taking by committee, and these have no place in motor racing. Had Renault been run on the lines of McLaren or Williams it would have been invincible — but then much the same could be said of Ferrari.

Even though the works team is shortly to fold, Renault engines will continue to be supplied to other teams so the possibility of a Renault engine powering a driver or team to a World Championship still remains. Whether or not that happens, the company leaves F1 a completely different scene from that which existed in July 1977 when, at Silverstone, Jabouille debuted the world’s first turbocharged F1 car.

You may also like

Related products