editorial, October 1997

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Current page

125

Current page

126

Current page

127

Current page

128

Current page

129

Current page

130

Current page

131

You may have trouble believing this. I did. Some – I’ll use the word ‘people’ instead of the rather more accurate but less publishable alternative have broken into Jenks’ home and stolen, among others, the frame of a 1938 Norton ES2 motorcycle, its 500cc engine, and a rare Austrian Steib sidecar. The horror is that the crime seems to have been committed neither by juveniles nor opportunists. To get to these rarities, the thieves walked past a sizeable amount of junk and took only those things of value. And, as Doug Nye points out to me, unless you know specifically to the contrary, the frame of a pre-war Norton ES2 looks pretty much like any one of the many other bits of metal that would have been lying around. These people knew what they were looking for.

You can, perhaps, imagine how upset this has made Jenks’ friends, and particularly so the old soldiers from his motor-cycling days. Right now they are less interested in revenge than return. I understand they are of the view that if what has been taken is returned immediately and unharmed, then they would be prepared to leave the matter there. So, please, if you know anything at all about this, find space in your heart to help. Jenks, as you will know, was not a man of many possessions and these few artefacts amount to a sizeable proportion of what remained of his legacy. To those who stole them, they will, perhaps, have some value; to the friends he left behind, they are priceless. If you’re in any kind of position to help you can call me, here, or Odiham Police Station on 01256 405270.

You will doubtless be saddened by the story of Stuart Lewis-Evans which starts on page 48. I may be wrong but it seems to me that we lost a disproportionate amount of British talent in the tragic decade that bridged the 1950s and ’60s. You should, also, be enthralled as its author is Robert Edwards, author of ‘Archie and the Lister’s’ whose latest book, ‘Managing a Legend’ proved fine company during a week’s break snatched between issues. In its essence, it is the story of Ken Gregory, his relationship with Stirling Moss and the rise and fall of the British Racing Partnership. While the subject matter twangs less readily on the heart-strings than Archie, the tale is both worth telling and predictably well told.

The debate about who is the greatest racer of all, is, for once, taking a interesting turn. The reason is Michael Schumacher, who, says Eddie Jordan among others, is the greatest of all time. Full-stop. What fascinates me about Schumacher is not his ability in the car, but his even more outstanding talent outside it. He won two races this year, in Monaco and Spa, before even doing up his belts.

It is, of course, impossible to guess how a Moss would manage a car where aerodynamic grip meant a corner’s duration had a greater influence on its competitiveness than its angle, just as you cannot say how Schumacher would Fare in a car which, if its tail wasn’t out of line in 130mph curves, was off the pace. I’m not convinced Herr Schumacher is the greatest, but suggest he is the most complete racer who has lived and you’ll find no argument from me.