The other 'eternal second'

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Current page

125

Current page

126

Current page

127

Current page

128

Current page

129

Current page

130

Current page

131

Current page

132

Current page

133

Current page

134

Current page

135

Current page

136

Current page

137

Current page

138

Current page

139

Current page

140

Current page

141

Current page

142

Current page

143

Current page

144

Current page

145

Current page

146

Current page

147

Current page

148

Not Leonce Girardot who, in the heroic age of motor racing, earned this title by the number of times he finished second (he won some races too!), but a crimson Austro-Daimler which, in my teens, I would very much have liked to own. It had been raced hard at Brooklands by George Newman, who also drove a Salmson. He had a well-known motor business in London’s Euston Road, and incidentally went on his honeymoon in a wartime Avro 504.

Clive Dunfee, brother of ‘Bentley Boy’ Jack, had been competing in JP Turner’s 2-litre A-D but, by 1927, he’d acquired the bigger car, which placed second eight times overall! Clive had ceased to run it by ’31 and was sadly killed when the Bentley he was sharing with Jack went over the banking in the 1932 500-Mile Race.

Both Dunfee’s car and Turner’s orange A-D took part in other races apart from the second-placed ones, Dunfee with thirds etc, Turner securing five seconds and also a win when his A-D dead-heated with a 12/50 Alvis in 1926.

Clive’s A-D looked every inch a racing car, with a six-cylinder twin-cam 2994cc (74x116mm) engine fed by twin carburettors and dual ignition from two Bosch magnetos. It was alleged to be a Targa Florio car, though I could never confirm this. In 1932, it was taken over by LF Dove and driven for him by RE Hall. Dunfee had lapped Brooklands in it at 109.22mph. After it ceased to be raced I discovered it, an unexpected sight, in a very small showroom in a Wimbledon cul-de-sac, price tag £100; but its fate is unknown.

After those dominant successes by the Porsche-designed Alpine A-Ds in the Prince Henry Tours and Alpine Trials before WWI, the WienerNeustadt Company followed up with many more successes in Continental post-war events. Herr Neubauer, for instance, won his class in one of the Porsche-engineered Sascha A-Ds with twin-cam alloy-block engine and four-wheel brakes, made in 1100cc and 1500cc forms.

These A-D racing cars (apart from the 19/100 sportscars) were available in this country because A-D aero-engines had been imported by the Scottish firm of Beardmore to Britain with a Mr FW Luther in charge, so after the Armistice he was able to supply these racing cars, too.

Thus Malcolm Campbell won two classes at the 1922 Saltburn sand-races and Luther, in the same 1.5-litre Sascha, with the Deuce of Spades emblem on its radiator cowl, was third in class at Aston hill and at Westcliffe. But Campbell failed to start in the 1922 200-Mile Race, the car probably being sold, perhaps to RB Tennant, who had used a sports Beardmore in sprints in Scotland.

Campbell and Newman may have handled sales for Luther, who had the British A-D concession. What I suspect was that one of the pre-war Alpine A-Ds got here, Woolf Barnato running it at the Track in 1921, and Lucas Scudamoor and then R Sahl drove an 1100cc Sascha for a Major Bradshaw, up to 1925.