Show and sell

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Current page

125

Current page

126

Current page

127

Current page

128

Current page

129

Current page

130

Current page

131

Current page

132

Current page

133

Current page

134

Current page

135

Current page

136

Current page

137

Current page

138

Current page

139

Current page

140

Current page

141

Current page

142

Current page

143

Current page

144

Current page

145

Current page

146

Current page

147

Current page

148

Current page

149

Current page

150

Current page

151

Current page

152

Current page

153

Current page

154

Current page

155

Current page

156

Current page

157

Current page

158

Current page

159

Current page

160

Current page

161

Current page

162

Current page

163

Current page

164

Current page

165

Current page

166

Current page

167

Current page

168

Current page

169

Current page

170

Current page

171

Current page

172

Current page

173

Current page

174

Current page

175

Current page

176

Current page

177

Current page

178

Current page

179

Current page

180

Current page

181

Current page

182

Current page

183

Current page

184

Current page

185

Current page

186

Current page

187

Current page

188

Current page

189

Current page

190

Current page

191

Current page

192

Current page

193

Current page

194

Current page

195

Current page

196

Current page

197

In America, car auctions are high-octane events

It may surprise you to hear that RM Auctions has only ever held three sales in Europe during its 17-year history, and yet claims to have sold over £68 million worth of machinery in those three sales. That’s several million pounds in commission alone.

So why aren’t more American auction houses frantically paddling across the Atlantic to get a slice of the action? Well, Motor Sport travelled to Monterey for the Pebble Beach concours and auction weekend to ask David Gooding, president and CEO of Gooding and Company, about the US auction scene and RM’s success across the pond.

“I wouldn’t rule out [coming to Europe],” he says, “but we are very intent on wanting to offer the market something different. If we feel there is a niche to fill and the market will respond to us, then we’ll fill it.

“Perhaps in the future it’s something we will consider. We’ll do a car auction when we feel the time is right.”

What is certain is that, with the publicised success of RM, other houses will be speeding up the rate at which they consider such a move.

One thing the American houses do particularly well is the show surrounding the event. Indeed, RM got a name for itself in Europe for making an auction exactly that – an event. It’s no different here in Monterey, with music, videos and lights accompanying the lots up for sale.

“I think it’s important and we can add value to the cars,” says David. “It’s not just about adding explosions and fireworks – if we present a car in a really exciting manner, we translate it in a way that gets it across to a client, that adds value.

“You know you can take that Ferrari over there,” he turns, pointing to a 1950 166 MM Berlinetta Le Mans, “and just roll it onto a stage and present it as a ‘beautiful Ferrari’. Or you can have lights, music and a video of it roaring down a track and screaming through the turns. Then all of a sudden you feel like you’re in the car. You can feel the g-forces and the revs, and that gets your blood pumping. That can make the difference between a million dollar bid and a two million dollar bid.”

However much RM and Gooding and Company’s competitors dislike such an approach, it certainly seems to work when it’s applied in the right way at the right auction. You only need to look at past results to see how well some cars are selling. The four auction houses that hosted sales over the Monterey weekend (Bonhams and Butterfields, Russo and Steele, RM Auctions and Gooding and Company) all produced extremely successful sales and attracted some fascinating cars.

Without doubt one of the highlights was the 1960 Jaguar E2A that Bonhams sold at Quail Lodge on August 15. The hammer finally dropped at an impressive £2,672,700, but this came as no surprise to the many who were familiar with its history. The car, widely considered to be one of the most significant surviving prototypes ever to come to auction, was driven by none other than Sir Jack Brabham, Bruce McLaren, Dan Gurney and Walt Hansgen during its racing years, which included the 1960 Le Mans 24 Hours.

It was built by Jaguar as the ‘link’ between the D and the E-types, and housed a fuel-injected 3-litre motor which sadly failed six hours into the race at La Sarthe (the head seal had gone and a piston burned). The Jag had spent the 40 years prior to the auction in one family’s ownership – let’s hope the new owner continues to let us see it at events such as the Festival of Speed.

Down the road, and only a couple of days later, Gooding and Company showed us that its approach does seem to work. As David suggested, giving the cars some ‘life’ as they went under the hammer worked well, with the company managing to sell over £16m worth of cars in two days. However, some interesting cars failed to reach their estimates (the 1932 Bugatti Type 46 Sport Saloon sold for a mere £200,000), while others from Dr Peter and Susan Williamson’s collection of Bugattis sold for record-breaking prices.

The star of the show was without doubt the 1937 Bugatti Type 57SC Atalante Coupé which sold for £4,239,000. This rare machine is from the Williamson Bugatti Collection and has a very comprehensive history, starting with Robert Eonnet in 1936 (the date he ordered it from the factory), who happened to be a sportsman, a bobsledder and a member of the French ski team, and ending with the Williamsons who have owned it since 1974.

You may also like

Related products