Readers' Letters, October 2015, October 2015

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Current page

125

Current page

126

Current page

127

Current page

128

Current page

129

Current page

130

Current page

131

Current page

132

Current page

133

Current page

134

Current page

135

Current page

136

Current page

137

Current page

138

Current page

139

Current page

140

Current page

141

Current page

142

Current page

143

Current page

144

Current page

145

Current page

146

Current page

147

Current page

148

Current page

149

Current page

150

Current page

151

Current page

152

Current page

153

Current page

154

Current page

155

Current page

156

Current page

157

Current page

158

Current page

159

Current page

160

Current page

161

Current page

162

Current page

163

Current page

164

Current page

165

Current page

166

Current page

167

Current page

168

Current page

169

Current page

170

Current page

171

Current page

172

Jenks got it wrong…

Jenks used to be dismissive of the retro Mille Miglia. It’s not often I’d disagree with him, but I managed to wangle a break in Tuscany and watched the event come past my holiday home.

I spent four hours on a roundabout, on a fast section of dual carriageway, and the free show seemed endless. I saw the D-types and Testa Rossa mentioned in a recent issue, but best of all was the Italian police’s positive attitude – motorcycle outriders clearing the road for competitors and supporters. I guess it is comparable to the Tour de France caravanne. It had an amazing atmosphere and everyone knew about the Moss/Jenks record!

Get out your calendars and start planning. You could even do a day trip into Pisa with the almost-free airlines.

Colin Love, Wilden, Beds

Old ways were the best

I have subscribed to Motor Sport since 1967 as a 14-year-old smitten with Jim Clark and all things Lotus. I still have my first copy from March of that year!

I wanted to compliment Simon Taylor for his brilliant article on three Team Lotus mechanics. The stories and tales were fantastic and it reminded me how pure and simple racing was in those days. The challenge remains the same – to drive quickly, smoothly and beat the opposition – but with 40-plus engineers rather than the three of yore. Life has become too complex by far. What great characters the sport had – and what engineering skills, too.

Congratulations on keeping the sport on its feet and recalling the magical days in which I grew up. Motor Sport is still by far the best magazine in the business.

Chris Kadwill, Harlow, Essex

Digital aroma

I was enjoying your Digital Extra in the August issue and watching Jim Clark’s performance in the 1965 German GP. As his car swept by the camera, I got a distinct whiff of burning oil and thought, ‘This is the real deal: picture, sound and smell.’

Sadly, I soon realised my wife had fired up the barbecue. It was the smell of charcoal that triggered my memories.

Michael Hunt, Prescott, Arizona, USA

Satisfied customer

I purchased my first Road &Track in 1958, which I still have, along with copies of Motor Sport from the early Sixties. While a bit elderly, I am still enthusiastic and felt your July 2015 was the best issue I’ve seen of any magazine connected to motor sport.

I trust Jenks and Bod are smiling happily somewhere.

D E Hidde, Mequon, Wisconsin, USA

Grand old Duke of Yorkshire

Your Geoff Duke obituary mentioned his 1949 success on two wheels, but did not include any reference to the following events.

On April 20 1946 Sgt G E Duke competed as one of 73 riders in the Ilkley Grand National Trial, the first big event of its kind in the area since 1939. He was part of a three-strong team from the Royal Signals, Catterick, riding a 496cc BSA.

The following year there were 12 entries from the Royal Signals, all riding Matchless machines. That year, Sgm Croft, L/cpl Skelsey and Sgt Duke won the team award and each member received a pint tankard. Sgt Duke also won a first-class award for finishing seventh overall.

Everyone has to start somewhere!

Bryan Kitching, Ilkley and District Motor Club

Ice cold in Indiana

It was nice to see fan favourite Roberto Guerrero getting some coverage in Motor Sport. He was lucky enough to be racing in America before all the moaning about ‘foreign drivers’ started and was always a tough competitor.

But the 1992 Indy 500? That was torture. The article described conditions as “unseasonably cold”. Too kind by half. It was foggy, misty and so cold that every piece of long-sleeved clothing had been bought from the souvenir stores before the start. I even donned a sweatshirt I had bought for a friend.

Buick’s engines had previously been quick but unreliable, so many of us thought the only good thing about the cold conditions would be that Guerrero’s pole-sitting car might last.

The pace laps began uneventfully, but for the fact that the mist was so thick we couldn’t see Turn Four from our seats halfway along the straight. Then, on I believe the last pace lap, we saw Guerrero’s car swerve, hop and drive into the infield grass near Turn Two.

A huge sigh from the crowd followed – no Buick challenge that year, we thought. But some history was made: I believe Roberto became the first Indianapolis 500 pole-sitter never to complete a single competitive lap!

The race itself was chaotic. The track surface never warmed properly, which led to spins, accidents and long yellow flag periods… causing tyres to cool yet further and triggering more of the same.

The only good news for Buick was Al Unser Sr finishing third, although that was more to do with avoiding accidents than his car’s true speed.

As for us fans, the seven-lap final dash between Scott Goodyear and winner Al Unser Jr enlightened a dark day.

Norman E Gaines Jr, Hartsdale, USA

Waterloo sunset

Mark Hughes was right about being careful what you wish for (July issue).

In the 1970s and ’80s it was said all you needed to go racing was a Cosworth DFV, a Hewland gearbox and some metal to wrap it all up. It certainly made for close – and dangerous racing.

There was, however, a body of fans (including, if memory serves, your own DSJ) who despised these ‘garagistes’; who felt that Grands Prix should be about the best drivers tackling the toughest tracks, in the best machinery, and that the only way to achieve this was to tempt back major manufacturers.

Unfortunately, major manufacturers equate to major money which in turn leads to reduced competition.

Manufacturers will not support spending caps on research and development, because the benefits from these are passed on to their road cars, which is why they are in racing. Any attempt to introduce such changes could lead them to withdraw from the sport.

Do we really want that, or should we not accept that for Grand Prix racing to remain at the pinnacle of our sport it has to evolve constantly and not remain trapped in a time warp.

For people like me who prefer the old days, there is always the joy of historic racing – and we can afford the admission price.

Michael Cartwright, Waterloo, Liverpool