Precision, October 2019

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Current page

125

Current page

126

Current page

127

Current page

128

Current page

129

Current page

130

Current page

131

Current page

132

Current page

133

Current page

134

Current page

135

Current page

136

Current page

137

Current page

138

Current page

139

Current page

140

Current page

141

Current page

142

Current page

143

Current page

144

Current page

145

Current page

146

Current page

147

Current page

148

Current page

149

Current page

150

Current page

151

Current page

152

Current page

153

Current page

154

Current page

155

Current page

156

Current page

157

Current page

158

Current page

159

Current page

160

Current page

161

Current page

162

Current page

163

Current page

164

Current page

165

Current page

166

Current page

167

Current page

168

Current page

169

Current page

170

Current page

171

Current page

172

Current page

173

Current page

174

Current page

175

Current page

176

Current page

177

Current page

178

Current page

179

Current page

180

Current page

181

Current page

182

From the 25th anniversary of the revival of A. Lange and Söhne to the half-century of the famous Rolex ‘cyclops’ date window, 2019 has been a year of horological birthdays – with one of the more notable being a diving watch that’s become a cult collector’s piece.

The model in question is the Doxa Sub 200 T.Graph that became the production version of the SUB concept shown at the 1967 Baselworld watch fair. As well as being water resistant to 300 metres (100 metres more than the Rolex Submariner), the SUB concept also featured a patented rotating bezel incorporating the U.S. Navy’s ‘no decompression’ limits, a ratchet bracelet clasp and a screaming orange dial.

The first watch to use the colour, the Sub Concept was not designed merely to look the part, but as a functional instrument that was obtainable only from dive shops.

Doxa’s product boss, Urs Eschle, was inspired to make such a serious underwater tool by the burgeoning number of magazine articles, documentaries and TV shows that came about following the perfection of SCUBA during the 1950s. Diving watches, such as the aforementioned Submariner and Blancpain’s 50 Fathoms, had been available for more than a decade, but they were mostly worn by military and professional divers and were expensive.

Eschle saw a market for a more affordable watch made for the growing army of amateur divers. In 1962 he developed the original Doxa Sub with the help of Claude Wesly, a member of aqualung co-inventor Jacques Cousteau’s underwater exploration team.

Eschle refined the range, releasing both the Sub 200 T. Graph and the Sub 300T Conquistador in 1969, the latter being the first to feature a helium release valve in order to prevent a build-up of tiny molecules of the gas from blowing the crystal off during a diver’s ascent to the surface.

The SUB 300T and its derivatives became the default equipment of many professional and amateur divers, even finding fame in film on the wrists of Robert Redford in 1975’s Three Days of the Condor and Matthew McConaughey in 2005’s Sahara.

To mark both the 130th anniversary of the Doxa dial name and the 50th anniversary of the Sub 200, the firm is introducing two special models – an 18 carat gold Sub 200 T. Graph powered by an original Valjoux 7734 movement and available in just 13 examples, and a steel re-issue of the standard Sub 200 that will be released in an edition of 130.

Doxa SUB 200T Graph in gold. £37,000 on rubber strap, £59,000 on special request gold bracelet; SUB 200 130th anniversary, stainless steel (pictured), £1000, doxawatches.com


First designed for drivers, but made considerably more famous by becoming the first watch to be worn on the moon during the Apollo XI expedition of 1969, the Omega Speedmaster has been re-commissioned in this platinum-cased special edition. Fitted with a ‘reborn’ version of the Calibre 321 hand-wound movement used in the original 1957 model, it gets an onyx dial, while the three subdials are made from meteorite.

Omega Speedmaster Moonwatch 321. £45,000, omega-watches.com


Bamford Watch Department started out as a maverick maker of bespoke Rolex models. Now it is the official customiser of TAG Heuer and Zenith – and has partnered with jeweller/artist Black Badger (AKA James Thompson) to create 10 Carrera models with dials made from ‘Fordite’ – the name for the accumulation of overspray in automotive paint booths. The dials are made by slicing the surplus paint into discs, revealing the unique swirl of colours within.

BWD X Black Badger Fordite TAG Heuer Carrera £5500, bamfordwatchdepartment.com


Motor Sport’s monthly watch review Precision is written by renowned luxury goods specialist Simon de Burton

 

Related articles

Related products