racing in germany

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32

RACING IN GERMANY.

TWO interesting events recently took place at Freiburg, in Germany, when the A.D.A.C. organised its annual kilometre record attempts and hill climb. Classes for motor cycles, sidecars, sports cars and racing cars were contested and large entries were received for both events. In the kilometre speed trials some excellent speeds were attained, particularly by Swiss riders ; Franconi on a ” Standard-M.A.G.” of 350 c.c. attained 92.5 m.p.h., thus putting up a higher speed than any rider of 500 c.c. or 750 c.c. machines. .Alfter, another Swiss on a Zenith J.A.P. accomplished 117 m.p.h. in the 1,000 c.c. solo class and 100 m.p.h. with the sidecar. A 175 c.c. D.K.W. also attained the excellent speed of 67.5 m.p.h.

Turning to the sporting car classes, fastest time was made by Kimpel on one of the new Mercedes-Benz cars (illustrated elsewhere in this issue). Kimpel’s speed was 111 m.p.h., other Mercedes annexing the remaining places in the 8,000 c.c. class.

In the 5,000 c.c. class Delmar on a Steyr attained 109 m.p.h., while in the 3,000 c.c. a 2,300 c.c. Bugatti won at 100 m.p.h.

With the exception of Momberger’s supercharged Bugatti, the racing cars were somewhat disappointing. Momberger attained 121 m.p.h., thus making fastest time of the day and winning the 3-litre class. In the 2-litre class, however, one of the old racing Mercedes defeated two Bugattis and won its race.

From the spectators’ point of view, the hill climb was perhaps a more interesting event. The course was roughly 12 kilometres in length, and as the photographs show, included numerous corners and bends and traversed some exceedingly beautiful country.

Fastest motorcycle time was made by Bussinger on a 500 c.c. A. J.S., who just beat the time of Franconi on the 350 c.c. M.A.G. Both rode extremely well, won their respective classes and averaged about 41 m.p.h.

A. J.S. machines were second and third in the 350 c.c. class but all other places in the 175 c.c. 250 c.c. and 500 c.c. classes went to foreign machines—D.K.W.’s, U.T.’s and Standards being well to the fore.

The Zenith rider Alfter won the 750 c.c. class in very good time on what appeared to be a touring Scott, beating a Tornax and an American Super X.

Speeds in the 1,000 c.c. class were poor, first place going to Giggenbach on his BayerlandJ.A.P.

The sidecar classes called for considerable activity on the part of the passengers and British machines swept the board.

Bornstein on a Norton won the 600 c.c. class, while first and second places in the 1,000 c.c. class went to Dobler (New Imperial) and Dchinden (Brough-Superior) respctively.

Once again in the sporting car class fastest times of the day were made by the supercharged Mercedes, young Caracciola being first at 43 m.p.h., with Kimpel only a fraction of a second slower. Walb on another Mercedes was third.

By reason of his very fine driving Caracciola thoroughly deserved his win.

The next smaller class was’ again won by Delmar on the 4A litre Steyr in spectacular style, while Bugattis won 3,000 c.c. and 1,500 c.c. classes ; the 2,000 c.c. class was. won by a local built Simson-Supra in good time.

The chief thrill of the day, however, was provided by the ‘racing car classes in which Rosenberger and Merz, the Mercedes and Bugatti stars were matched against Momberger on his 120 m.p.h. car of the latter make.

Rosenberger drove the amazing 1914 Grand Prix winner and made fastest time of the day, beating Merz by 7 secs. at 44 m.p.h. A wonderful tribute to Mercedes design.. Momberger was not at home on the corners and was beaten by the above pair and Hensser on a Steyr. The 2-litre class was also won by a Mercedes of more recent vintage, driven by Werner, while a Scap won the 1,500 c.c. class. Rosenberger’s driving was magnificent and indeed the performance of the Mercedes and Bugatti cars and drivers throughout the meeting was extremely praiseworthy.

A NEW MODEL ROVER.

• WELDING.

Renewals in the shape of cylinders are fairly expensive matters, particularly when the car concerned is somewhat aged, but owners of cars may take heart of grace from the numerous and difficult repairs effected by Messrs. Barimar Ltd., 14-18, Lamb’s Conduit Street, London, W.C.1. In the case of a four-cylinder engine which re-. cently came under our notice, one valve setting was badly cracked and one very badly worn. The owner considered that an entirely new cylinder block was his only hope. That, of course, would have mulcted him in a fairly considerable sum, but Barimar Ltd., were able to restore it to him, guaranteed, as good as ever, at a cost of two or three pounds.

Undoubtedly one of the sensations of the Motor Show will be the new six-cylinder Rover car. Rumours that a Rover ” six ” was to be introduced have been heard for some months, which is not surprising since the new model Rover has been undergoing tests for over a year. Recently one of the ” sixes ” has been through a most searching trial in the English Lake District and has proved that it is in every way satisfactory.

The new car is to be known as the ” Two litre six cylinder” Rover, its engine capacity being a little over 2000 c.c. There is nothing freakish nor, indeed unorthodox about it, straight forward practice being embodied throughout. The engine has, of course, overhead valves, and everything in the chassis is of remarkably neat and clean design. I understand that the price is to be very moderate and since the car will be in every way up to Rover’s high-class standard of workmanship and finish it should be a most attractive proposition.

The 10/25 h.p. car, formerly known as the “Nippy Nine” will for 1928 be retained in the models in which it is at present made, as will the famous ” Silken Sixteen,” the prices in each case being unaltered.