MISS BRITAIN I.

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“MISS BRITAIN I.” MR. SCOTT-PAINE’S NOVEL CRAFT

AFTER successfully passing her preliminary tests, ” Miss Britain I,” was shipped to America on the 16th of last month, where her designer and owner, Mr. H. Scott-Paine will compete with her in the 5i-litre class of the International Contest now in progress at Detroit.

“Miss Britain I,” is of very novel design, and in appearance is most unusual. While a single-step hydroplane design has been adopted it is uncommon in having a superstructure built upon it, which runs from bow to stern. This superstructure embodies two cockpits in tandem, the one ahead being for the passenger, and the pilot’s is amidship. In this part of the boat, Mr. Scott-Paine has adopted, to a large extent, aeroplane practice, the assembly being made up with longerons, struts, diagonals, gussets and stringers. It is, in consequence very light yet strong. The engine, as mentioned in last month’s MOTOR

SPORT is a six-cylinder Scripps, which gives off 120 h.p. at its maximum revs. of 3,100. This is installed in the stern and a short shaft takes the drive to a gearbox just aftof the pilot’s cockpit, and another shaft transmits the power to the propeller. The petrol tank is fitted under decking and” Petroflex ” tubing is used throughout the fuel system leads. ” Autopulse ” pumps are used. The control cockpit is well faired round the opening, and it is clear that the designer has carefully considered the question of air resistance.

Two rudders are used. One is situated at the stern and is off-set, while the other is placed forward. The former is operated by a wheel and cables, and the latter is moved by an aircraft type of rudder-bar—another very unusual feature.

News of this unorthodox, but cleverly designed craft’s behaviour in the U.S.A. will be awaited with interest.

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