Letters from Readers., September 1932

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Letters from Readers.

SIR,—We noticed with interest, the remarks about the McEvoy Special Morris Minor driven at Shelsley Walsh.

We would point out, however, that the Supercharger fitted was not a Powerplus as described, but a Zoller unit supplied by Mr. L. Pomeroy, Jnr. of Forced Induction, Ltd.

We should be very glad if you could mention this in your next issue.

M. A. McEVOY. 5th August, 1932.

Brooklands Accommodation. are

WHEN are the Brooklands authorities going to take steps to provide adequate accommodation for spectators ? On August Bank Holiday one glaring deficiency was brought out when the rain storm swept over the Track. The unfortunate people in the Paddock are not provided with any cover whatsoever—with the exception of the tea-room —and consequently they were forced to take shelter as best they could in the stalls which were already fully occupied by the racing cars and their drivers and friends. Fortunately, the owners of the various filling stations and depots in the Paddock gave the spectators the run of their premises. Of the spectators who lined the Finishing Straight those who ran to the Pork grandstand found that all available shelter had already been claimed by the

occupants of the top of the stand, while those who decided to make a dash for the stands at the top of the hill were soaked through before they had toiled wearily up the steep, slippery hill.

Another point. Isn’t it about time some sort of stand, or even a series of ramps, was erected at the Fork on the Paddock side. Such a crowd collects now at this excellent spot that unless one gets there a whole race before the mountain event is due to be run, one has to be content with a place in the second or third rows. Also, is it too much to expect that an attendant is sent down there to keep inconsiderate people from running their cars right up to the fence ?

Long Sufferer.

Carshalton.

An Appreciation.

SIR,—For some time I have noticed the wonderful strides MOTOR ST’ORT has been making, each issue being better than the last, and after reading your August number I feel I must congratulate you on the excellence of your magazine. To me, MOTOR SPORT represents a complete history of motor racing, and I have on my book shelves every volume since it first started life as “The Brooklands Gazette.” In particular, your extraordinarily complete accounts of

Continental events are of great interest to those who take a scientific interest in motor racing. I have never read a finer report of a motor race than your account of the French Grand Prix in the ‘August number. I personally cannot afford to go abroad to see races, but I feel just as though I have actually witnessed the 1932 French Grand Prix, and that I know every inch of the course.

Another reason why MOTOR SPORT appeals to me is that your photographs are always so clear, and taken from original view points. Those illustrating the French Grand Prix were wonderful, especially the one of Nuvolari, with his wheels pointing straight at the camera.

I am glad to see that ” Sideslips ” is now a regular feature—his reminiscences: and anecdotes are delightful.

A criticism. MOTOR SPORT is SO seldom inaccurate that I cannot resist the temptation to point out the wording under the photograph of Mrs. Wisdom at Shelsley Walsh, on page 465. The photograph depicts an M.G. Midget, but the Wording says Frazer-Nash !

N. P. T 011114INSON. Newcastle-on-Tyne. [We stand corrected. The car driven by Mrs. Wisdom in the photograph referred to was an M.G. Midget. We thank the writers of the many letters we have received for pointing Out this error to us.—Ell.]

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