A SUGGESTION

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A SUGGESTION

Writing in a contemporary, R. A. Macdermid, the well known M.G. trials driver, makes the suggestion that normal readings of important instrument dials should be arranged so that the needles would all lie vertically m hen everything was in order, to permit easier reading. We had thought of this one ourselves, and heartily endorse it. A narrow racing cockpit may be confronted by a panel containing air, oil and blower pressure-gauges, water and oil thermometers, telecontrol settings, rev.-counter, sump-contents indicator, fuel-gauge, etc. If each needle lay in the same plane with everything normal, the driver’s task in knowing when, and what, changes were taking place in the machinery would be vastly simplified and race-successes enhanced with a reduction in ” expensive noises.” AnOther idea is that the aircraft hank-and-turn indicator in modified form might find a place in certain racingcar cockpits. Excellent aS modern tyres are, they can still give anxiety under certain conditions, such as in ultra-longdistance record attempts or during the hour record attack when extremely high speeds are maintained for the whole period. Unless a car is placed exactly right on the 13rooklands or Montlhery bankings the tyres are subjected to severe side thrusts and sciubbing action. Most oars will find their own course, but that course cannot always be held indefinitely, nor can a. driver get the car accurately on its course immediately on entering a banking, so that a bank and turn type of ‘ correct-course ” instrument might be useful on long record runs, or races,

to save the tyres to the uttermost. Such an instrument might also be valuable on the Karussel corner of the Niirburg circuit and particularly on the steep banking of the new Avus track. We do not suggest that drivers would have much opportunity during a race to consult the meter, but in practice it might be of assistance in indicating the ideal positioning, both from the viewpoint of conserving tyres and realising the minimum of speed-165s from tyre friction. If the driver cannot take his eyes trout the road, the meter might be made to record like a ” maximum-and-minimum ” thermometer, for Herr Naubauer to consult after each man’s practice run. Perhaps instrument makers and experienced track-drivers will eomment On this idea ?

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