Book Reviews, September 1948, September 1948

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“: PRIVATE OWN I.: It by L. R. Higgins (Foulis, 8s. 6d.)

This is a long-awaited 176-page book about motor-cycle racing, seen from the saddle by an amateur rider and tuner of Velocette machines. Racing at Brooklands, Donington, the I.O.M. and Belfast is covered, preand post-war. Higgins gives plenty of detail, such as technical reasons for retirements, and refers to his 1921 model-H Matchless and an aged Morris-Cowley that he used as transport for his racing bicycle in the early days of his career. The cost of racing is outlined, and there are good illustrations, although these photographs do not bear on the text to a greater extent than depicting the courses ridden over.

“TUB STORY OF THE MANX,” by G. S. Davison (T.T. Special, 8s. 6d.).

This little 136-page book, on art paper, is a follow-up of the author’s “Story of the T.T.” It gives the history of the Manx G.P. from 1928 onwards. There is an analysis of entries and lists of winners, place-men, lap record holders, etc.

There is, additionally, a wonderful analysis of the T.T. course mile by mile, detailing all the corners and items of ” scenery ” and quoting the appropriate gear used at given stops by a ” 500 ” rider. This will be of inestimable value to new riders.

“ROAD TRANSPORT CAPES” (The British Road Ferderation, 1s.).

This nicely-produced 32-page booklet seeks to promote better facilities for the transport-driver. Whether the rougher types, excellent chaps that they are and grand job that they do, would really welcome chrol ium-plated snack bars on American lines is debatable, but, going to lesser extremes, this book talks lots of sound common sense. If you have never appeased your appetite at ” Bert’s ” it will mean nothing to you. If you can, on occasion, eat in company with the transport-boys without embarrassment, get a copy. Attempting to identify the many “pull-ups ” illustrated is, on its own, worth a shilling.

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