MATTERS OF THE MOMENT

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MATTERS OF THE MOMENT

A BUSY MONTH

sportsman. We start with the S pc( 41 Trials along Brighton’s Madeira Drive, one of our oldest spritit venues and, moreover, one which permits a kilometre run, so that the experience of sheer speed, rare in this country since the discreditable sale of Brooklands, can be enjoyed. After this meeting by the sea comes the International Prescott Speed Hill-Climb. It will be run as previous Prescotts have been run, by the Bugatti Owner’s Club, and with the self-same racing and sports-car classes. This implies perfect organisation, to which will be added the spice a seeing, not only whether Mays can regain the course-record from Gerard, but who will go home with the R.A.C. Hill-Climb Championship.

Next we have the J.C.C. excursion to Goodwood, with eight scratch races, including the Goodwood Trophy for 1f-litre G.P. cars.

Shelsley Walsh follows, with a mixed car and motor-cycle meeting. When Leslie Wilson put over this experiment in 1946, Ernie Lyon’s Triumph beat Mays’ E.R.A. by 0.18 sec. But rather than couple bicycle with automobile, you should enjoy the finesse of the riders of the former whilst absolving the drivers of the latter from unfair comparison.

Then, as if September’s main fixtures are not enough, October early provides the R.A.C.’s Silverstone Meeting, which constitutes our most important racing since 1938. It is to be expected that the attendance will prove for all time that the British public wants and appreciates motor racing. Rightly or wrongly Col. Barnes refuses to desecrate the Sabbath, but doubtless grandmothers will expire and stomachs derange themselves in sufficient numbers on the Second of October to ensure full enclosures and car parks. The big event is the R.A.C. Grand Prix International Car Race, to give it its full title. Prize money already totals £1,865 and £500 will go to the entrant of the winning car. The race is, of course, for Formula I cars, and the distance will be 65 laps, or approx. 250 miles. Starting positions will be determined by the lapspeeds set up during the training periods scheduled for 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on September 80th and October 1st. The race will terminate immediately the winner is flagged. Entries, limited to 25, at £15 a car, closed on August 80th.

Preceding this entirely satisfactory form of motor racing there will be a ” 500 ” Race, over 20 laps, or approximately 75 miles. This interesting event is not confined to 500 Club Formula cars, but is open to unsupercharged four-wheeled cars not exceeding 500 c.c. Nevertheless, it is the 500 Club’s dream come true. At Brough we had a foretaste, mainly by Moss in his Cooper, of how well the better 500s take to circuitracing. But it will be immensely interesting to see how they will stand 75 miles of this activity. We have heard that their consumption of alcohol fuel is not exactly economic and pitstops are likely to be rife in consequence. As engines have to be stopped for re-fuelling and restarted with the help of not more than two assistants, the 500 Race will not necessarily go to the swiftest.

Certainly we are due for some extremely absorbing sporting week-ends in the course of the next few weeks. September is a singularly busy month for the motoring

THE MOTOR SHOW

This year the approach of winter Vill be heralded by a function we have not enjoyed since pre-war days—the S.M.M.T.’s Motor Exhibition at Earl’s Court. It will be our 33rd International Private Car Show and it opens on October 27th. It is MOTOR SPORT’S intention to outline the attractions of this Motor Show next month and to advance the publication date of the November issue, which will be a Special Show Number, to coincide with the opening day of the exhibition. But rumour is already busy in relation to this forthcoming display of the products of our Motor Industry, so, as a premature whetting of the appetite, we will venture to record some current surmises. One of our biggest manufacturing organisations is said to be introducing an entirely new semi-aerodynamic car which will combine dignity with a remarkable performance, apart from its long-awaited and equally smooth-contoured “peoples car.” The new Aston-Martin will be present, blushing under its Spa laurels, and they say that a very well-established 90 m.p.h. Britisher will be found to have adopted i.f.s. Rumour persists that a make which has always combined briskness with utility will be seen in exciting new guise and that a new twin-o.h.c. engine may make its appearance behind a very well-known radiator. We are merely recording the hearsay of the bar and smoking room and certainly refuse to confirm or deny. But of one thing we are certain—this long-awaited Motor Show will be sensational by reason of the scope, technical excellence and the new designs which our Motor Industry will present in this International Shop Window. It is well that this is so, for the publicity value of Earl’s Court has not been overlooked by our competitors. America is to be represented by the products of Chrysler, Dodge, General Motors, Hudson, Buick, Lincoln, Oldsmobile, Studebaker, Pontiac and Packard. The continent will present the latest from the Citroen, Delahaye, Panhard and Levassor, Hotchkiss, and Renault concerns. Fortunately, this country finds its metier when competition is keenest.

THE BELATED B.R.M.

Addressing the Motor Trades Luncheon Club in Manchester, Rayrxiond Mays said that the engine of the first British Racing Motor will probably be tested this month or next, and that the first car should be ready for its trials early next year.

Everyone regrets that the B.R.M. was not ready this summer. We all know the difficulties that have to be overcome these days in the matter of supplies and we realise how easy it might be to complete the car too quickly, rendering it merely another S.E.F.A.C. or Arsenal. The fact remains that the B.R.M. is overdue, and that all those who have this project at heart are impatient for news. Surely we can be told a little more beyond the fact that a V16 engine and 5-speed box will be used ? Cannot a hint be given as to why the first car has been delayed ? A progress report would do much to guarantee the continued enthusiasm that exists for this vital undertaking. We invite Raymond Mays to submit it.