Letters, September 1961

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GERMAN WORKMANSHIP 


Sir, 
I am English, married with one child and wor_ in an automobile plant as an assembly fitter. Nothing in fact very unusual about that, except that I work in West Germany and have a)ittle to do with “that car.” . Through steady readership of your magazine I remain in tguch with conditions prevailing in the equivalent industry in England, and in my position of split loyalties it is difficult to read con­tinuously of praise for Continental vehicles and the apparent unsatisfactory inspection and finish of the British product. 
Our workers here are divided into three basic groups: Group 3: Mainly women and teenagers for light assembly · work, car polishing and final preparation, etc. Group 4: Heavy work using power tools, but requiring more mechanical bias as opposed to: Group 5: Sheer strength for labourious work under adverse conditions, i.e. bolting bodies to chassis, etc. 
We work two shifts and the work averages 44 hours weeklv. Our wages are calculated as follows: the time and motion study people inspect every job and then allocate a specific time allowance plus a percentage rest time. This standard time is then termed 100 per cent. and for this guaranteed minimum I receive on group 4 D.M.2. 10 per hour. The only snag is that the conveyor belt is set to run at 130 per cent. and we all for our extra money must work piece rate, the rate being calculated on the number of cars perfeclly assembled in that shift, all those sub-standard and rejected on inspection not counting. Although the inspection of vehicles is of the highest standard the inspectors receive less wages than the fitters, and as a result seem to develop a perfection complex, i.e. if you cannot justify your higher wage by doing your job correctly, then it is my duty to reject your sub-standard work. As an example-I fit the door keep in position and as a pre­cautionary measure three pins are circlipped in position. One of these clips is rather inaccessible and can hardly be seen. I failed to fit two correctly and this small and almost insignificant fault was picked up within 30 minutes by inspection, and all the cars I had fitted that shift were then double inspected on this one point. The penalty for continuing mistakes is permanent relegation to a lower job until one is either sacked or a job is found to match one’s capabilities. When, as is nearly always the case, we achieve our 130 per cent. target (we work by the way an 8-hour shift with one 15-minute break) then I earn monthly D.M.550 and our budget is: 
Income Tax D.M. 40
Insurance ,, 6o
Rent (new flat, 3 rooms plus bath and
kitchen)
Food-thanks to an efficient wife ..
Surplus (about)
” 1 45
” 170
” 135
By comparison a VW de luxe costs D.M.4,600, a it-litre saloon D.M.6,600 and a 220SE about D.M.1 2,000. This then is the other side of the picture where despite expand­ing markets shoddy work is just not allowed by the management or unions.. Why no strikes ? The unions have successfully negotiated continuous wage increases for the workers always lower than the ris.e in industrial productivity over the same time. The country becomes every year economically stronger ano money buys more, and inflation is noticeably absent. The workers are satisfied with this continuous improvement and the fact that communism is illegal contributes a lot to this peaceful state of affai.ts, We have too many refugees and live too close to be favo1.1rably influenced by communism. The British industry as I see it has at the most a few years to put 4ts house in order before the impact of the Common Market is felt. I sincerely hope it wakes up to reality in time, and more power to the Editorial·elbow to this end. 


John L Prince


COMMON MARKET COMMENTS 
Sir,
The. prodigious volume of criticism that has been levelled at the British Motor Industry’s working standards and inspection system must abate if, and when, this country joins the Common Market. Vehicles of British manufacture will be directly com­parable to Continental makes without the inclusion of import duty to push the latter up in price. Already, as one of your readers has pointed out the ubiquitous Volkswagen will compare favourably in price to our own ADO models. The outcome of this direct competition will prove of great interest to anyone interested in motoring, especially in the economics of car owner­ship and running costs. I believe that the average British owner ts not the high wage earner with two cars, or even the type of person who can afford to change his car every two or three years as some sections of the Press would have us believe; he is, I opine, someone rather like myself who earns a fair wage, whose wife must also work to help pay for a house, who begins his marriage on the proverbial shoestring, and who most of all puts curtains, furnishings, and the garden before buying a new car. Dig below the statistics issued and you will find this type of person every­where. The standard of living has not risen so much that we are all on the threshold of supertax. It is this average car owner who will find an improvement when the Continental models are offered in Britain at really keen prices. The British car is not as strongly constructed as its Continental counterpart, nor have British workers the same pride of work­manship that you can find among the Germans and Swedes, for example. Taking low priced cars only, there is an immense gulf of loving care between the construction of the B.M. C. twins and the Volkswagen or Saab. Either of the latter will give longer service than the Minis seem equipped to do, which means better buying for the average chap. Both marques have extremely high engineering standards and take every care of the finish of each vehicle; Volkswagen spares are excellently produced and their service is second to none, given time for the marque to popularise itself Saab will doubtless offer the same comprehensive service. I believe Renaults also offer good ” after-sales-service “. Can our own marques compare? I don’t think so. With their sights very firmly lined on the export markets the major groups are inclined to ignore their home buyers, or at the most offer service that often takes months. In price, therefore, in quality, and in service British manu­facturers have a lot of leeway to make up. I am considering the field of vehicles between the Ford Popular and the B.M.C. Farina range because I know that the Sunbeam and Jaguar people offer exceptional value-but I cannot afford either and I don’t think many other men can. Neither are really family transport for the family man anyway Inclusion in the Common Market will force the lasting qualities of British cars up to compete with Continental equality in prices, patriotic owners who ” Buy British ” will at last get a family car of really good quality that will withstand fair wear and tear, give fuel economy, and perhaps a reduction in insurance like the Herald. A car mechanically equal to Wolfsburg’s baby with the aerodynamics of the Saab, and Saab’s idea of equipment to boot. Then we would have a good car. It surely isn’t too much to ask that instead of striking for more pay the motor workers got down to their basic job and built a few cars instead. At the present moment there is too much bitching done and not enough work. We are taxed up to the hilt as it is-give us something that is worth paying taxes for. At present I can’t think of one car in the £500 -£800 class that shows good workmanship, solid construction, attention to detail, comprehensive instrumentation, and decent design. Me ? When I can afford to replace a very sick pre-war Series E, there will not be a British car in its place. It will be Volkswagen, unless … . 
b. L. IZZARD. Sleaford. 


RELATIVITY


Sir,
In June I spent a most enjoyable week-end at Beaulieu attend­ing the Jaguar Silver Jubilee Week-end Rally. I was a proud man when my wife won the Car and L:idy Concours d’Elegance. Imagine my feelings when in your July issue I read your report on this event in which you described Mrs. Hughes as an elderly lady. 
I consider this to be a most ill-conceived and discourteous description of a person in their mid ‘forties and I trust that you will have the good manners to apologise in your next issue. 
MF Hobbs, Cardiff
(Apology appended. Age is relevant and although I am now technically described as ” middle-aged ” I am always hopeful that ” young women ” will overlook this purely technical term! To me, any lady over 25 is “elderly.” After all, age is relevant, and if Mrs. Hughes was described as ” elderly ” this is different from ” old,” and was merely in relation to Tommy Sopwith’s some­what less-elderly passenger, who, by elegance and grace, Mrs. Hughes beat in this beauty contest, for which congratulations. Verily, you cannot please all the customers all the time but certainly to be discourteous to this charming lady and smart Jaguar never entered my head.-ED.). 
THE H.R.G. ASSOCIATION 
Sir,
Your photograph of the Frazer Nash and G.N. race at Oulton in the August issue made me reflect on what a shame it is that the race was not also open to their successors, the H.R.G.s. Alas, there seems little hope that this will ever come to pass and the H.R.G.s will be condemned for all time to contest M.G.-As, and even T.V.R.s and Lotuses, not to mention other modern machinery. A year ago, following a note in MOTOR SPORT, the H.R.G. Association was formed and is now, counting our American assoc­iates, nearly one hundred strong. As soon as we could, we approached the leading vintage and post-vintage club in the country, but were more than somewhat disappointed by the suggestion that we could, with the exception of the few prc-1940 Hurgs, join as Associate members, pay a sizeable sum and merely watch from the sidelines, as we were not eligible to race. In vain did we point out that the H.R.G. was virtually unchanged fro:n 1935 to 1955 and alone of all English makes did it reappear unchanged after the World War. In the circumstances, we formed a strong association with the Singer O.C., which has flourished ever since but even with the Le Mans contingent in the Singer O.C., there is still relatively little contemporary opposition for the Hurgs. In these slightly frustrating circumstances, therefore, I am writing this open letter to Frazer Nash and G.N. owners in the hope that it may be possible to improve our plight to the mutual benefit of all. I would personally welcome correspondence and discussion which would lead to this end. It may also be that members of the vintage club in question could help and I would be most grateful to them. 
I. J. DUSSEK (Hon. Sec., H.R.G.A.) . Farnborough Park. 


BAN ON FOREIGN CARS?

 
Sir,


The general attitude towards foreign cars becomes more amusing, and at the same time pathetic, every day. An excellent example of this was at the prize-giving following the Silverstone meeting on July 8th. The victors of the Formula Junior, Pro­duction Car and Intercontinental Formula races were each pre­sented with their well-won trophies, and it was stated by whom they had been entered and which marque of car they had been driving. When it came to Moss’ win in the G.T. car race, absolutely no mention was made of the unmentionable car (foreign) in whrch he rather easily won. Nor was any mention made of it in the B.B.C. sports. report, nor in the reports of the Sunday papers which I· read. As the very proud. owner of a foreign (Swedish) car myself, I find the situation most amusing. But with the imminence of the Common Market and the deplorable state of our exports, surely it is time that the British withdrew their ostrich heads from the sand and faced reality, espe.cially with regard to inspection and finish of cars, spares and after-sales scn·icc. 
C. H. SHIRLEY., Solihull


NEW PETROLS 


Sir,


In your August issue (page 648) reference is made to” Lobitos ” as being one of the new petrols now available in this country. 
We would like to correct the impression that our petrols h::t’e only recently been introduced here as, in fact, they have been on sale in the north-west of England since 1934, in which year our refinery at Stanlow, Cheshire, commenced production of a full range of petroleum products. Motorists in Ulster and Eire, however, will be more familiar with the ” Lobitos ” brand-name as our petrols have been marketed throughout both countries for many years and it would not be necessary to travel very far before seeing a ” Lobitos ” pump. 
, Lo’BITOS 0ILflELDS, LIMITED. 
R. W. McFadyen (Wholesale Sales Manager). London, S.W.1. 


BRITISH AND PROUD OF IT!


Sir,
I read with interest every month, letters from readers criticis­ing various cars, regrettably mostly British; 11nd I wonder whether they are just unlucky, or–? Two and a half years ago I wanted to change my car, but the new one had to fit a fairly critical specification. It had to be a comfortable 4-scatcr of about rt litres, small enough to be con­venient in our We-St-Country lanes, yet large enough to take a family of four plus luggage, a reasonably sporting performance, yet docile enough for the wife to drive, and above all a useful 4-speed gearbox with floor change. By that I mean a box with a high top and third gear; I object to a box where first is so low that it is never used, then having to pay an extra £60 odd for an overdrive to obtain a reasonable and economical cruising speed. Heater and screenwasher preferably standard fittings and all this to be provided at a not too excessive price. The result, if you have not already guessed, was a Riley 1.5 (who could get a school trunk in a VW ?). This car has now done 36,000 miles and still averages 37 m.p.g. on Super Shell and 1,000 miles per pint of Energol Visco-Static, cruising between 50 and 6o m.p.h. The only extras fitted have been a pair of Noteks, radiator blind, and of course safety harness. Troubles, well, to be strictly honest there was a faulty oil seal in one rear hub, and the back of the driver’s seat did collapse, but these matters were put right under guarantee, entirely free of charge. Since then the speedo. head packed up at 33,000 miles and I have just fitted the second set of Michelin ” X “s. There is only one observation that I would make in conclusion; for fast driving the tyre pressures recommended in the instruction book are far too low, producing understcer ” something awful ” I run my ” X “s at 30 lb. all round and it is a different car.
T. S. HICKS. Launceston. 


APOLOGY 


Sir,


I am terribly intrigued-do tell me, why did “M.L.T.” of MOTOR SPORT ” correct ” the way in which my family has spelt the rather well-known name of Haig, to that of ” Haigh,” in the article concerning me in last month’s copy? So far as I know, the most notable member of the name of Haigh to hit the head­lines was the late Mr. Haigh of Crawley, who carried out some rather successful, and original, acid-bath murders. The rather better known name of Haig (or well known if only for the whisky advertisements!-John Haig was my grcat­grandfather), has, I admit, only four letters, and I can only assume that to have such a simple and uncomplicated name is not, nowadays, considered to be quite genteel. However, we really do prefer to stick to the old well-known spelling, if you don’t mind! So will you, please, put a correction for me in next month’s copy of the paper, as this saves the trouble of much future correction which might arise from it? (You have my form returned to you, and you will also find it correctly spelt in books of reference, etc.). 
BETTY HAIG (Miss). [Quite !-ED.]. 




ERROR


Sir,
While reading through the article on the British Empire Trophy in last month’s MOTOR SPORT I came across the following error. Halfway down the first column it is stated that Jack Brabham brought the Indianapolis Cooper into the pits during the early stages of the race. Later on page 665 it says that Jack took the Indy. car on a couple of anticlockwise demonstration laps, anti­clockwise because of the cars biased cornering. The latter is in fact the case but the car used in the race was Jack’s own privately entered car. I am a regular reader of the magazine and I was a little surprised to find such an error in such an excellent publication. 
D.J. L. LINE (17). Enfield. [I can only assume that the Assistant Editor had too much sun on the Continent when he confused these Coopers-or too much ‘Haig’ !-ED.]. 
T.V. AND MOTOR RACING 
Sir,
This week B.B.C. Television is spending about 4t hours at the International Horse Show plus another 5 hours at the Good­wood races and between them I.T.V. and B.B.C. will spend something like 4 hours at horsey events this Saturday Ouly 29th). This does not take into consideration the coverage on sound radio. Need I say more? 
P. S. STEPHENSON. W. Ewell. 


SALESMANSHIP 


Sir,
What a superb example of British car salesmanship we wit­nessed in Edinburgh this week with the arrival of the first Jaguar E type. Having heard that a coupe was on view we joined the crowd outside the showroom and peered through the window to where the ” beast” stood tethered. One brave spirit ventured into the ” sanctuary ” and was met by a pleasant salesman obviously proud of his charge and keen to discuss it witl, even impecunious enthusiasts. Soon there were four of us admiring and dis­cussing the many points of interest-not daring to touch, just looking. The state of bliss was not to last, for alpng came another (per­haps the Daimler?) salesman, his face flushed witl, anger, and with a show of temper slammed the bonnet shut, closed the only open door and all but chased us out of the showroom. Perhaps our presence did not grace his establishment but neither did his ill-mannered display impress us. One hopes he will never have to sell a car or there will surely be empty pockets in Coventry. 
G. T. WAL.KER. Edinburgh


POOR SHOW B.M.C. ! 


Sir,


After having read the letter from “Popeye” in your July issue of MOTOR SPORT, my friend and I wholeheartedly agreed witl, his views regarding the so-called new, “even spriter” Sprite. Only a few days before reading his letter we were confronted, yet again, with another Farina-inspired monstrosity, namely the MG Sprite.
What, may we ask, has happened to the quality of design, the individuality, and tl,e eniliusiasm of today’s British car designer? Why must we be dominated by the influence of Continental trends, when surely we have in this country and no doubt at M.G.s, the brains and initiative to produce a body fit to carry the world renowned octagonal emblem? Thank heavens we at least have a few people left in this country, like John Sprinzel, for example, capable of, designing an indi­vidualistic body. After having seen the new Sprite at Spa Francorchamps, we can say with some justification that e,:-en our sports cars seem to be included in this Farina invasion of squared, finned and shapeless pieces of coachwork. How far can this t,end continue ? 
Surely it will not’ tnfiltrate into the stables of individualists such as the Morgan, Lotus and Jaguar? If that day e’.l!r comes, we will both return to our old_ love-motorcycling! 
TONY BROOKES, JOHN BUTTERFIELD. B.F.P.O. 42. 


GOOD FOR SMITHS 


Sir,
Your recently published correspondent’s experience with Smiths Motor Accessories has prompted me to take up pen in their defence. A couple of years ago they made up a special instrument to my specification, going to a great amount of trouble to have every detail correct. Cost was most reasonable, delivery was ahead of their estimate, and tl,ey meticulously answered every question and point raised with iliem. In short, it was a pleasure to do business witl, them, and a very refreshing change from the treatment one receives from many other firms, both large and small, maey, of whom can’t even be bothered to let you have details of. the products they are endeavouring to sell. Usual disclaime.r. 
J. E. HODGSON. Milnthorpe. 


Sir, Recently there have appeared, in successive issues of the Magazine, criticisms of the service offered by the Smiths Instru­ment Company, and as I am sure you would like to maintain a proper balance in these matters, perhaps you would be kind enough to publish these brief comments of my own experiences. They may have a somewhat deeper significance for the majority of your readers than would be. the case ‘with the ordinary motoring public, because I have for’ many years now, indulged in the rather questionable pastime of rebuilding vintage machinery. Over the last 25 years I have tackled most of the English breeds and it is surprising what a large proportion have brought me into contact with Smiths, who appear to have been the producers of the majority of instruments fitted to iliese cars. For the past 10 years I have conce1:1trated on Bentleys, who, of course, originally fitted Jaeger instruments and this Company in its turn was absorbed by the Smiths Group. I have never failed to obtain tl,e maximum help from their Service Department, however, un­profitable and inconvenient the research might have been for the Company. In the case of my Bentley activity, they have even searched their factory for the oldest employees, who could claim a working knowledge of the particular instruments, and on at least two occasions, bezel switches have been repaired from tl,e almost forgotten contents of a particular workman’s bench drawer. Recently, just before their labour troubles began, tl,e electric clock of my Bristol failed and I sent it to the works for attention. In tl,e fullness of time this was returned, with no more tl,an the usual delay one would expect in tl,e circumstances, but without any charge to me, and this, despite the fact the guarantee period had long expired. Of course, in this impersonal age and in view of the tremendous growth in the Smiths organisation, it is inevitable that the system must, from time to time, give cause for complaint, but it is only right iliat the creditable aspects of any service should receive equal publicity. I can, therefore, only speak as a satisfied customer, who has very little to offer in exchange for services rendered, except prompt payment of accounts and whatever value can be attached to my loyalty. 
T.QUAYLE. Plymouth. 
[Good for Smiths. But when will they return to tl,e good old cloclwork car clocks which worked reliably for 20 years or more, instead of making electric timepieces which, if the two I have had in the Editorial Mini-Minor are typical, eiilier stop com­pletely or work erratically after a matter of months, or less.-.co.J. 


NO ACCOUNTING FOR TASTE 
Sir,
I enclose a cutting from Exchange & Marl, accompanied by my own attempt to depict the incident as I see it. The cutting reads: “MOTOLYMl’IA NEWS-A client phoned for 3 r93r con-rod and had it for breakfast next morning. Write for anythinit (d1smontkrs) Motolympio by Station, WelshpAool. Tel.: 2327, ofter 8. 1 rewern, 337. Montgomery­shire.” 
G. EASTERLING.Cromer

THE OTHER SIDE OF THE COIN 

Sir,
Your correspondent, •· Disillusioned Motorist,” really is most unfair to our Police Force. The Police are not responsible for making the Motor Laws nor are they responsible for the punish­ment given to the wrongdoer. Referring specifically to the letter from ” Disillusioned Motor­ist ” I would make the following points: 1. He was exceeding the speed limit. The fact that he was doing so by 10 m.p.h., the fact that an adjacent cafe is the venue of 100-m.p.h. motorcyclists, the fact that his speedometer was incorrectly assembled are totally irrelevant. Very properly the police officer reported him. It is the job of that officer to do so. 2. Certain evidence given by ” Disillusioned Motorist ” in his defence and eagerness to co-operate (sic) was supported by photo­graphs and bills, none of which were returned. Does your correspondent seriously think that some sergeant purposely kept them? Maybe a Clerk to the Court has them but I cannot follow the argument that this casts the Police in a bad mould. 3. The final act. Licence endorsed and a £4 fine. Which shows incidentally, that a rear view mirror at 10 shillings is very good value. And now the final breakdown in Police/Public relations. Somewhere else, someone else was fined £1 for doing something different under different circumstances on a diffe’rent day at a (probably) different time! So what? The Magistrates were responsible for imposing the penalties, not the Police. Nowhere do I detect any possible cause for criticising the Police. The only person open to criticism is ” Disillusioned Motorist ” who, if you will allow me this simile, was careless enough to be fairly and squarely l.b.w. and then blames the umpire for giving him out! 

A. KNIGHT. Rochester


Sir,

As a regular reader of MOTOR SPORT, and also a police officer, I feel it my duty to defend my colleagues from the unjust criticism levelled at them by ” Disillusioned Motorist ” in your August edition. ” Disillusioned Motorist ” feels that the Police have been unfair in their treatment of him, but I would like to make the following points which I feel are relevant to this matter. 1. In the first place, “D.M.” was reported for speeding, an offence which he does not deny. He also does not deny that he had been exceeding the speed limit by 10 m.p.h., even though as he discovered later his speedometer was not functioning correctly. Therefore, he presumably has no grouse against the officer report­ing him for summons. The officer did not know of the inefficient speedometer, and was only doing his duty in reporting the offender. Whether prosecution is undertaken is a matter for his superior officer, as he pointed out. So far I can see no cause for complaint. 2. It was pointed out to “D.M.” that there might be a three­month delay before he heard any more about the alleged offence. This is in order, providing that the officer pointed out to” D.M.” at the time, the offence for which he was being reported, and told him that he was being reported for the question of prosecution to be considered. A delay is inevitable, but a three-month delay would be unusual in my own Force. 3. “D.M.” pleaded guilty to the offence, and therefore can­not complain about the fine. Apparently he has driven 350,000 trouble-free miles in 15 years, and accordingly might expect that to be taken into consideration when his punishment is con­sidered. I do not doubt that it was, but that is a matter for the Magistrates to consider, not the Police. The Police duty is to report the offender, and a plea for leniency or of mitigating cir­cumstances is for the Court to consider. 4. “D.M.” sent his ” gujlty plea” to the Court of Petty Sessions, presumably he enclosed the documents and photo­graphs at the s.ame time. The Court is not controlled by the Police, and if the documents have not been returned, that is a fault on the part of the Court clerical staff, not the police office. 5. As regards the second case which “D.M.” quotes, it is rather difficult to comment not being in possession of the full facts. However, “D.M.”. sees fit to cast aspersions on the honesty of the Police, indicating that the youth was only fined a total of £2 be<:l!use his father had been in the Police Force, and both his brothers were serving members. Surely if the Police were corrupt, ‘the prosecution would never have been brought in the first place-: Also, the Police brought sufficient evidence to prove the case, as the defendant was fined. The extent of the fine is not a matter for the Police. It is the Police duty to report the offender, and the Court’s decision, whether the officer agrees with it o.r not, is not his affair. No one is perfect, and no organisation is beyond reproach. The Police make mistakes, naturally, but fortunately they are few and far between. Criticism is a good thing, because it should ensure that the person making the mistake does not make the same mistake again. However, I feel that in this case the criti­cism is directed in the wrong direction. “D.M.” was fined for an offence to which he pleads ” guilty.” The Magistrates Court did not return documents and photographs which he posted on his behalf. The son of a former police officer is fined for two offences, and because he was not fined as severely as ” D.M.’ a strong letter is sent to MOTOR SPORT criticising the Police as a whole, and worse.ning the public relations which I personally am forever doing my’best to improve. I hope that this letter is published, or one of a similar nature, in order that the readers to your fine magazine may have a chance of judging for themselves both sides of. this affair. 

“POLICE OFFICER.” [Name and address supplied.-ED.]. 

[These letters are published because we like to give both sides of an argurnellt. But it should be obvious that in an age when young children are be.ing raped, women molested and old ladies beaten up and left for dead by criminals who all too frequently go undetected, motorists cannot take kindly to being ” booked ” by policemen for going rather too fast in speed-limit areas or for parking in a wide deserted street, etc. We want more under­standing magistrates when motoring cases are heard, standardisa­tion of fines and more sensible employment of policemen, who are manly young chaps whose job should surely be mainly concerned with apprehending criminals and thugs. Of course, if you don’t like the ” cissy ” task of ” booking ” morally innocent motorists no-one in the whole wide world can force you to become a policeman.-ED.]. 

OPINIONS 

Sir,
I was surprised, with a certain amount of pride, to see my letter in print in the July issue. It has caused a mixed bag of criticism and praise from family circle to complete strangers; from veterans to moderns. One very dear old boy of the nos­talgic brigade told me quite firmly that the ” Best Car in the World” was not a” Rails Race” but a “Naypiah.” A very tatty Railton was submitted for my inspection, with drop-head dropped and now unraisable. If about a dozen people took hold of wings, doors and odd fittings, the engine ticked over in near complete silence. I was informed ” it went like a bomb,” but it was admitted a brick wall was the only expedient for emergency stopping! A more modern species asked if I’d seen a ” Farina,” I believe Mark 4, with ” cocked-up ” fins removed and replaced with fins made with an eye-to-line. Believe they cost about £40, fitted. These, a few chrome embellishers, plus a rear window Leopard with stop-light eyes, I am led to understand, makes a perfect car! How stupid can we get ? My wife asked me if ” snogging ” means back-seat driving. I agreed it was as good a definition as any! Yes, I will try the 1500 (unmentionable) when it arrives, as it well might be the answer. 

Also to inform you that Mr. Morgan, Secretary of the B.A.R.C., is obtaining a few more J.C.C. Badges for members who have lost theirs, so all will shortly be well, with the missing ” Tooth ” on ” Badge-plate ” back again. 

Southampton. GERALD L. ADAMS. 
 

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