The B.M.C. ban in Australia

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According to the Melbourne Herald, the Confederation of Australian Motor Sport, which is the controlling body, imposed a ban on all cars of B.M.C. manufacture from taking part in Australian competitions for three months. The ban included B.M.C. cars entered by private owners, and affected about a third of the entries at the recent race meeting at Warwick Farm and, if not lifted, would have precluded B.M.C. participation in the Australian Economy Run, 6-hour Bathurst Production Car Race and 500-mile Saloon Car Race at Phillip Island.

The ban was imposed because B.M.C. claimed a new round Australia record by an Austin of 36.4 m.p.h. The C.A.M.S. did not supervise the run, nor does it permit record attempts on open public roads. The ban would be lifted immediately if B.M.C. would retract their claim, said the C.A.M.S. but this they at first refused to do. Shell had also referred in advertisements to the Austin’s “record-breaking” run but tinder pressure from the C.A.M.S. changed this to “history-making” run. Later B.M.C. capitulated and the ban was lifted.

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The honeymoon couple who were helped by the driver of Wolseley 1500 528 BXH in Scotland when their Renault Dauphine broke its gearbox ask this good samaritan to communicate with them. Letters can be forwarded.