The fate of the CD Bradfords

Author

admin

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Sir,

I note the reference to the CD Bradford vehicles which Jowett Cars Ltd. were running in prototype form when car production ceased at Idle in 1954.

I visited the Jowett works on many occasions during the last six years or so prior to the closing of the Batley factory at the end of 1963, and the prototype private-car version of the CD Bradford was in fact in use there by the staff up till about eighteen months before the closure at Batley.

About five examples of the “CD” were being used at one time by Jowett Engineering Ltd., as the firm then was—three pick-up trucks, a station-wagon and the saloon car.

By this time all of these had been fitted with Javelin engine and gearboxes, all the i.o.e. engines having disappeared. Being prototypes, body parts and some of the running gear were presumably non-existent as spare parts, and one by one each of these vehicles was dismantled to supply parts for the remainder.

When the closure came at Batley late in 1963 only one, a pick-up, remained and this was in poor condition, having been sadly neglected. This example I eventually managed to purchase and intend, when time permits, to restore it to good health. At this time, also, the body shell of the saloon car was still lying around outside the factory, and this I tried to obtain also. Unhappily the distance involved in transporting it delayed any decision, and next thing I knew it had been cut up for scrap. A great pity.

About 15 or so CD Models were actually produced, and a number of them were sold new to New Zealand. Two examples are registered with the Jowett Club of New Zealand, one of them— a station-wagon—being fitted from new with an R4 Jupiter engine! It is also rumoured that an example exists in New Zealand still fitted with the i.o.e. engine. Should this be so it will almost certainly be the only example of this unit in existence.

As far as I know the pick-up mentioned above is the only example surviving in Britain.

Kinross.
George M. Mitchell.