Cars in books, September 1986

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

It may not be generally known that Jerome K. Jerome, author of  “Three men in a Boat” and its sequel, was a pioneer motorist, but from a chapter from another book of his published in 1926, called “The Wheels of Change”, sent to us by Vincent Freedman from Papua, New Guinea, this is quite apparent, and it would be interesting to know what cars he owned. What is especially interesting is that he describes going on the original Emancipation Run of 1896, but not in any detail. It seems that Jerome went on a “high two-seater with the editor of a financial journal”, with a driver up front, named Duguid, and that they arrived about last, if not actually last, in Brighton. The make of the car cannot be substantiated from the description.

It is well-known that the popular heavyweight boxer, Henry Cooper, is fond of fast cars and much can be learned of this from his autobiography published by Cassell in 1972, in which he refers to his family’s first car, an old black second-hand Ford Prefect, the Alfa Romeo in which he drove to Buckingham Palace for lunch with the Royal Family, the Bentley he had when he went to the Palace again in 1969 to receive an OBE, the hired Rolls-Royce that took him to one of the memorable fights with Cassius Clay, and the cars he later owned — Morris Cowley, Fiat 1800, 2.4 Mk II Jaguar, Mk X Jaguar, Alfa Romeo Ti, Alfa Romeo GT, Mercedes-Benz 220SE coupé, T-series Bentley, Jensen Interceptor (his favourite), Mercedes -Benz 280SE, and BMW 3.0S. But read his book for yourselves.

I pursued “The Letters of Ann Fleming”, edited by Mark Amory (Collins Harvil 1985) without finding much about cars, except that it is revealed that Ian Fleming ‘s mother had a Rolls-Royce that sat outside the Metropole in Monte Carlo all day in case she wanted a breath of fresh air and that when the Rolls-Royce Company gave a cocktail party there was a Concours d’Elegence, which at 90, in a car ten years old, which made it a 1962 model, she would win — in fact, all that happened was that they tried to sell her a new Rolls-Royce. And that Ann Fleming, wife of the creator of James Bond, ran into a taxi at Euston Square in 1964, her first motoring contretemp for 30 years. But the book is full of interesting anecdotes for all that. The Hon. Patrick Lindsay and Whitney Straight and his wife Lady Daphne Finch-Hatton, appear in the text and there is mention of Lord Lambton hiring a 1920 Rolls-Royce saloon in 1958 to take Mrs Fleming and the Edens to Donnington Grove, a car she describes as more dignified and  comfortable than a Thunderbird (Ian Fleming ran a Ford Thunderbird at the time). Anyway the old Rolls-Royce with “its dusty beige luxury”, was approved of.  There is also mention of the Humber Hawk with silver eagle on the bonnet, owned by Raymond Carr, which the Flemings used when staying in Portofino until Ann Fleming had the “clutch come away in her hand” in the heart of the Sperrin mountains,  so that after endless walking for help they were rescued by a turf-cutting family who enjoyed the situation and the silver eagle and were finally towed away by an ancient Morris.  There is too, a reference of a softening of Barbara Castle, the then Minister of Transport, to her attitude in 1966 of being adamant about keeping the 70 mph Motorway speed-limit; but alas, what do we find but that it is with us still, twenty years later.

You may also like

Related products