A Long And Grinding Road

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

August 16 marked the end of a long wait for Nigel Mansell. Some 12 years after he made his F1 debut, and almost six since a dramatic tyre explosion robbed him of what looked certain to be a first World Championship title, he finally made sure of motor racing’s most coveted crown.

Mansell’s efforts in recent years have been good news for British motor racing. Win or lose, he has ensured that the sport has made unprecedented headlines in the national media. Hopefully, his accession to the World Championship will give the industry further impetus; the success of Mansell and the consistently high level of performance from Martin Brundle and Johnny Herbert should not be allowed to obscure the fact that British motor racing still requires substantial financial support from grass roots upwards if the present momentum is to be maintained.

Mansell is Britain’s first champion for 16 years, and our seventh overall. (Between them, Britain’s seven F1 champions have won 11 titles.) There is a wealth of home-spun talent capable of following in his footsteps, but in this day and age determination on a Mansell scale may not be enough to get them through the ranks. If we want to fête another British champion before 2008, we must not allow the present euphoria to make us complacent. Rather, now is the time to invest in burgeoning talents. No organisation with even half an idea about PR will have failed to notice the benefits of having a patch on Nigel Mansell’s overalls in recent months.

On the subject of championships, we would like to salute Renault for its part in the success of Mansell and the Williams team. Tantalisingly close to the crown with Alain Prost in 1983, the French giant has been waiting for an F1 championship title since before Mansell emerged as a serious contender. Although Williams-Renault has still to put the constructors’ title beyond its adversaries’ reach — though it looked to be no more than a formality as we closed for press — Renault’s response to once omnipotent Honda has been magnificent. It’s a point which has often been overlooked in recent outbreaks of nationalistic fervour. S A

You may also like

Related products