Book reviews, September 2016, September 2016

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Current page

125

Current page

126

Current page

127

Current page

128

Current page

129

Current page

130

Current page

131

Current page

132

Current page

133

Current page

134

Current page

135

Current page

136

Current page

137

Current page

138

Current page

139

Current page

140

Current page

141

Current page

142

Current page

143

Current page

144

Current page

145

Current page

146

Current page

147

Current page

148

Current page

149

Current page

150

Current page

151

Current page

152

Current page

153

Current page

154

Current page

155

Current page

156

Current page

157

Current page

158

Current page

159

Current page

160

Current page

161

Current page

162

Current page

163

Current page

164

Current page

165

Current page

166

Current page

167

Current page

168

Current page

169

Current page

170

Current page

171

Current page

172

Current page

173

Current page

174

Current page

175

Current page

176

Current page

177

Current page

178

Current page

179

Current page

180

Current page

181

Current page

182

Current page

183

Current page

184

Current page

185

Current page

186

Current page

187

Current page

188

Tony Bettenhausen & Sons

An American Racing Family Album

Gordon Kirby & Susan Bettenhausen

American independent Racemaker has of late introduced several very fine books that combine high production values with content you are unlikely to find elsewhere. This is from precisely that mould.

As the ‘album’ part of the title suggests the content is mostly photographic, although Motor Sport’s US editor Gordon Kirby
provides some solid textual structure. Of the many US racing dynasties, the story of the Bettenhausens – double US national champion Tony and his sons Gary, Merle and Tony Jr – has been told less frequently than most and is beset by far too many hard knocks. Not always an easy read, then, but this is a worthwhile record of a racing family whose influence is sometimes perhaps overlooked. SA

Published by Racemaker Press

ISBN: 978-1-935240-12-9, $59.95

Le temps des gladiateurs

Patrick Sinibaldi

A curious one, this. Written by a family doctor based in southern France and dedicated to the author’s hero Masten Gregory – something of a rare accolade in literary circles – it reflects an age when the sport was arguably more dangerous than implied by the simplistic message on the back of your admission ticket.

Essentially covering the 1920s to the early 1980s, the book’s themes include Dick Seaman, Bernd Rosemeyer, Archie Scott Brown, Jean Behra and the final world championship F1 race on the original Spa.

Gladiatorial, all.

Although there is an acknowledgment for English translator Alan Varley, this is essentially a French book that happens to feature a selection of extended captions and sidebars in English. It’s nicely done, but you’ll need more than a passing familiarity with Robespierre’s mother tongue to get the most from it. SA

Published by Editions des Abeilles

ISBN; 978-2-9556946-0-2, 48

The Original Ford GT 101

Ed Heuvink

We all know the story of the fabled Ford GT40: smarting from a failed attempt to take over Ferrari in 1963, Henry Ford II determined to create a sports car that would end the Italian’s dominance on the track and humble the hubristic Enzo. Three years later a pack of GT40s crossed the line at Le Mans in a 1-2-3 formation and the legend was born. 

What is a little less well known is the chequered development of that famous car, a story that this sumptuous coffee table book aims to tell. 

Things began badly: less than a year after the programme started two prototype cars were brought to the Le Mans test weekend. It soon became apparent that Ford was woefully unprepared. While Roy Salvadori complained that chassis 102 was “appalling”, the other driver Jo Schlesser in chassis number 101 found himself slithering off the track at the Mulsanne kink at about 150mph. Schlesser was unhurt but the car was destroyed. Evidently, development improved thereafter, but the shattered chassis 101 would play no further part in it.

Fifty years later the car was rebuilt by a collector and now confines its appearances to concours d’élégance. 

Published by McKlein and written by Ed Heuvink, The Original Ford GT 101 tells the full incredible story of Ford’s foray into racing and documents the history of chassis 101, including a forensic retelling of its restoration. Illustrated with evocative period pictures – many previously unpublished – as well as more modern photographs of the car being restored, and including a foreword by Henry Ford III, this is manna for enthusiasts. 

The book is limited to a run of 999 and costs a not insignificant £65 but, like the
Ford GT project itself, is worth the effort
and expense. JD

Published by McKlein

ISBN: 978-3-927458-82-6, 79.90

Lotus 98T Owners’ Workshop Manual

Stephen Slater

The 98T is to this day Lotus’s most potent F1 car, but it is perhaps more famous for being the last Lotus to wear the famous black and gold John Player Special livery. Driven by Ayrton Senna and Johnny Dumfries in the 1986 season, it helped Lotus reach third in the championship for constructors and to many fans is indelibly linked to a golden age. 

To celebrate 30 years since the car’s final competitive race at the 1986 Australian Grand Prix, Haynes has produced its latest owners’ manual to offer fans a glimpse beneath the skin of the 98T. The manual not only delves into the intricate details of the car’s drivetrain, but also gives a useful overview of the history of Lotus as well as including information on models as far back as the 93T.

As with previous manuals on Formula 1 cars the book features an array of detailed cutaways, illustrations and period photographs with forensic descriptions of the car’s mechanics and design – there is even a scan of the patent for the 98T’s turbocharger inlet systems, illustrating the depth into which the manual goes. It also provides a diverse range of first-hand period perspectives and dedicates an entire chapter to Senna, who had the job of taming the 1000bhp machine on track. It is best, however, when exploring the Lotus team’s work on the 98T’s aerodynamics, which were way ahead of their time in period. 

Those interested in the mechanics and specifics of the 98T or in Lotus F1 history (especially of the 1980s) will enjoy this.

With many contemporary photographs and interviews, the manual offers far more than just a number of mechanical illustrations. It is also an engaging snapshot of a popular period in Formula 1 history. WC

Published by Haynes

ISBN: 978-0-85733-777-1, £22.99

Bluebird CN7 – The Inside Story of Donald Campbell’s Last LSR Car

Donald Stevens

‘Inside story’ gets over-used, but here it’s literal – what lies under the flowing blue flanks of Donald Campbell’s final Land Speed Record car.

Author Donald Stevens joined the Norris brothers, responsible for so much Campbell record machinery, back in 1954 when the very successful water record hydroplane K7 was being designed and was involved from initial sketching of the fat blue cigar that would annex the record. If you enjoy machines and technical drawings, then relish this mix of paperwork from initial simple sketches through trial layouts to final drawings, accompanied by photos of the people, components, assembly and testing that produced the car, including a lovely shot of BP men practising refuelling on a dummy Bluebird – some bent tubes over painted lines.

Interesting nuggets include details of CN7’s head-up display, and the news that Raymond Mays told them you couldn’t use a wing for downforce in F1… GC

Published by Veloce

ISBN: 978-1-845849-75-7, £30

You may also like

Related products