Speedshop Road Car Buying

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

179

Current page

80

Current page

83

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Current page

125

Current page

126

Current page

127

Current page

128

Current page

129

Current page

130

Current page

131

Current page

132

Current page

133

Current page

134

Current page

135

Current page

136

Current page

137

Current page

138

Current page

139

Current page

140

Current page

141

Current page

142

Current page

143

Current page

144

Current page

145

Current page

146

Current page

147

Current page

148

Current page

149

Current page

150

Current page

151

Current page

152

Current page

153

Current page

154

Current page

155

Current page

156

Current page

157

Current page

158

Current page

159

Current page

160

Current page

161

Current page

162

Current page

163

Current page

164

Current page

165

Current page

166

Current page

167

Current page

168

Current page

169

Current page

170

Current page

171

Current page

172

Current page

173

Current page

174

Current page

175

Current page

176

Current page

177

Current page

178

Current page

179

Current page

180

Current page

181

Current page

182

Current page

183

Current page

184

Current page

185

Current page

186

Current page

187

It’s been dubbed ‘the most famous car in the world’. It’s not clear who said as much but, whether or not such claims are true, there’s little doubt that the Aston Martin DB5 is one of the most desirable vehicles of all time.

The British manufacturer has Eon Productions, the owner of the James Bond franchise, to thank for that. Giving the quintessential Bond Sean Connery a gadget-laden DB5 to drive in Goldfinger and then Thunderball secured the Aston grand tourer a place in the consciousness of the wider public. Cameos in later post-Connery Bond films, a big-selling Corgi model and now the official continuation car, announced last year, mean that everyone can identify ‘007’s Aston’, even if they can’t quite conjure the model name.

Bond didn’t drive a DB5 in Ian Fleming’s novel. He couldn’t, of course, because the book that shares its name with the movie was published five years before the car’s 1963 launch. In the book, his MI6-issue vehicle — complete with machine guns, revolving number plates, ejector seat et al — was an Aston DB MkIII, so it was only right that in Goldfinger released in 1964 that 007 should drive its mid-60s successor.

The car Fleming chose for Bond, correctly called the DB2/4 MkIII, was superseded in 1959 by the DB4, the first Aston to be built at the famous Newport Pagnell factory that remains in Aston’s hands to this day. The DB5 continued the development trend on its arrival four years later. It was more GT than sports car, a roomier vehicle with added creature comforts.

The DB5 wasn’t really a new machine, rather a revamp of the final DB4 Series V. It retained its live rear axle after a De Dion semi-independent system was considered and discarded. The all-aluminium, straight-six overhead-cam engine was enlarged from 3.7 to four litres, increasing power by 40 or so horses and, apart from the very earliest cars, a ZF five-speed gearbox replaced the four-cog David Brown transmission.

And it was all clothed in ever-more alluring aluminium Superleggera coachwork designed by Carrozzeria Touring in Italy. The DB5 wins hands down over both its predecessors and its successor, the 1965 DB6, in any DB beauty contest.

“Maybe this  is even the definitive Aston Martin, at least in silver”

Refinements found inside included electric windows for the first time and the option of air-conditioning. An automatic Borg-Warner transmission was a no-cost option.

As with its predecessor, there was a high-performance Vantage model with some 40bhp more due to uprated carburettors and reprofiled camshafts. And there was also a short run of convertibles, and even a shooting brake, originally a one-off to facilitate the hobbies of Aston boss David Brown, a hunting, shooting and fishing fan.

It is the two-plus-two coupé that is the definitive DB5, perhaps because it was driven by the definitive Bond. Maybe this is even the definitive Aston Martin, at least in silver.

There isn’t a record of how many of the 1500 or so DB5s built were delivered in what was officially known as Silver Birch. Aston, don’t forget, had a chequered history through much of the 1970s and into the ’80s, going bust on one occasion. But marque experts contend the shade it was not the most common choice of the time.

It’s also impossible to know just how many of the remaining DB5s are presently resplendent in Silver Birch. The likelihood is that it’s a sizeable majority. If you have the money to own one, you want it to look just like Bond’s – the most famous car in the world.

Aston Martin DB5

Price new £4248 (inc taxes)
Price now £550,000 to £1 million
Engine 4.0-litre 12-valve straight six
Power 282bhp
 0-60mph 7.1sec
 Top speed 145mph
 Rivals Jaguar E-type, Ferrari 275 GTB
Verdict The quintessential Englishman’s tourer


Market view

A cocktail of speed, comfort and versatility

It is hard to imagine a more quintessentially British sports car than the Aston Martin DB5, a style icon and a true driver’s car.   

A development of the DB4, this model took a successful formula, light Carrozzeria Touring body, wonderfully powerful straight six, and refined it.

With the ability to outpace all but the finest of its Italian super car rivals, while simultaneously carrying four passengers and luggage, there were few finer choices for a wealthy clientele.

The DB5 has today become one of the truly great collector’s cars. Prices have risen keenly over the last decade, helped in no small part by the world-famous James Bond connection. The film producers had wanted Bond to drive a Jaguar E-type, but the firm declined to lend any vehicles and Aston thus stepped in.

A regular saloon in average condition should hover around the £400,000 mark, but prices can double for a Vantage. At the top of the chain is the DB5 drop-head coupé, for which a buyer will expect to pay at least £1.2 million. Beyond that there is the ultra-rare DB short-chassis Volante, which can easily fetch more than twice as much as a DHC at auction. The owners of such wonderful vehicles consider them to be worth every penny…

David Bond, managing director, Footman James


DIGITAL EXTRA

You may also like

Related products