1970 PROSPECTS

Author

admin

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Current page

125

Current page

126

Current page

127

Current page

128

Current page

129

Current page

130

Current page

131

Current page

132

1970 PROSPECTS

GOOD RACING rather than interesting technicalities has been the keynote of the current 1600 c.c. Formula Two and things do not look greatly different for 1970.

For the past three years there has been a running battle in the top echelon of the formula between Rindt and Stewart, with Rindt usually coming out on top in the overall analysis, for one reason or another. It looked at the end of the season as though neither the Austrian nor the Scot would be racing very frequently in Formula Two, for Rindt was supposed to be driving a projected Can-Am car from Lotus, and Stewart, who had driven the same F2 Matra for three years, was without a car because of altered fuel tank regulations.

It now turns out that the Lotus Can-Am car was little more than a twinkle in Chapman’s eye and Rindt will once again be undertaking a full season of Formula Two, the type of racing at which he has excelled for so long. The “guts” of the Winkelmann team, in the form of Team Manager Alan Rees and Chief Mechanic Pete Kerr, are now behind the works March Formula One team, but Rindt will continue to have the cars maintained at Winkelmann’s premises in Slough and is taking a more direct interest in the running of the team.

Stewart is known not to cherish the idea of driving a tubular chassised car (as opposed to the safer monocoque design), but has been rumoured to be entered for the first race of the year, the W.D. & H.O. Wills Trophy at Thruxton. This race will have taken place by the time this month’s issue of MOTOR SPORT is published, so it is worthless speculating on the outcome of the negotiations. Nevertheless it is quite possible that Stewart will again undertake a restricted F2 programme in a car supplied by John Coombs, who ran Tyrrell’s F1 Matras in 1968 and 1969.

One thing is sure about this year’s racing and that is the arrival of sundry new faces from Formula Three and elsewhere. And a thoroughly International selection they are, too, for the names of an Australian, a Swede, a Brazilian, a Frenchman, an Irishman and even a Pole are among the “graduates”.

Instead of supporting the Tecno team, as they did last year, Shell France will this year be behind the entry of two Brabhams for Tim Schenken and Francois Mazet. The team will be entered by Sports Motors (Manchester) Ltd., the company which backed Schenken’s successful Formula Three cars in 1968 and 1969, and there will be additional support with the cars from the Brabham factory.

The Brabham BT30 has revived Brabham fortunes after a slow start to the 1969 season and already more than a dozen orders have been placed. Derek Bell, Peter Westbury, Scotsman Graham Birrell, Irishman John Watson., Carlos Reutemann and Benedicto Calderalla (both Argentinians with massive support from their own country), Alistair Walker and new team-mate Widdowa, all are expected to be seen regularly in Brabliam cars. Delays in the arrival of the bag tanks demanded (some say unnecessarily) by the 1970 regulations could delay things, but there is nevertheless a prospect of Brabham supplying a heavy proportion of the entrants.

The Lotus 59B was a particularly effective car in Formula Two in 1969. Extensive modifications to accommodate the new fuel tanks are said to have resulted in some radical alterations to the basic design, but Rindt’s car is basically the same one he used to win five races last year. His team has works (but not Gold Leaf) support and he will have John Miles as his second driver, as in Formula One. Private cars have been ordered by the Brazilian Emerson Fittipaldi, the Lombank Formula Three Champion for 1969, and a Polish nobleman, Adam Potocki, who has one famous win and several spectacular accidents to his credit in a short Formula Three career.

The Tecno team which last year had French Shell support is this year backed by anather French oil company, the expanding Motul concern. The 1970 Tecno looks very little different from the one used in 1968 and 1969: drivers will be Cevert (who was a surprised winner at Reims in 1969) and Regazzoni, returned after a brief and unfruitfill spell with Ferrari.

Three years of expensive effort have brought the BMW factory little reward and it is understood that 1970 will decide whether or not the German firm continues its participation in single-seater racing. The existing Dornier-built cars have been seen testing in readiness for the season, designer Len Terry being co-opted (for the first time) to help rectify some of the handling deficiencies which they were unable to pinpoint last year. Ickx has already tested the car and may join the team occasionally, although 1969 drivers Siffert, Hahne and Quester are retained.

Production space-frame cars were intended to supply March Engineering with the bulk of its “customer” car quota this year, but with so many orders for Formula One chassis the space-frame cars are not as numerous as expected. Nevertheless, orders for Formula Two cars are being fulfilled and the first customer to take delivery was Roll Stommelen. It was known that a works team would take part in Formula Two, but it was still a surprise to learn that this would be run under the auspices of Malcolm Guthrie, the wealthy F2 and sportscar amateur whose first year in Formula Two brought some creditable results. Leading the two-car team will be works Formula One driver Chris Amon: Guthrie will drive a second March 702 and Amon’s place will be taken by Peterson when Amon is otherwise occupied.

France has only one remaining Formula Two manufacturer following the enforced withdrawal of Matra, and that is the tiny Pygmee concern at Annecy near the Swiss border. New cars are being built: they will have sponsorship from the Elf petrol company and Patrick Dal Bo, son of the designer, will again be driving. The second driver is yet another Formula Three man in this case Jean-Pierre Jabouille. The Elf petrol company has offered support and there is the possibility of Beltoise or Pescarolo being seen in Pygmees if the cars prove more competitive than in 1969.

There is not much to interest the technically-minded in the 1970 crop of Formula Two machinery. Only the Pygmee and the BMW are monocoque and a March chassis has already been ordered by BMW “for evaluation”. Even so, the four-cylinder BMW is the most interesting engine with its three plugs per cylinder. When the engine was first announced, one wag was heard to remark that “if it needs so many firelighters, there must be something wrong with the fireplace”. Perhaps the BMW will prove not only as powerful as the Cosworth (as used by everybody else) but equally reliable: it certainly deserves to win something this year.

And what of Ferrari? At the end of last June following a demoralising Monza Lottery race, the Dinos disappeared and were not seen again. Lately, however, Brambilla has been seen testing one of them and there is a slim chance that the red V6 car may race again, albeit in private hands, for Ferrari is known to be encouraged by the Tasman Championship success of another Dino in 2.4-litre form driven by Lawrence.

So the 1970 season promises to be a battle of drivers rather than one of marques. There are so many young and “hungry” drivers who. have chosen Formula Two as their stepping-stone to their ultimate Formula One ambitions that this coming season promises to be the most intense struggle ever.—M. G. D.