Special Ts

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108

Sir,
Regarding H. F. Spong’s letter about above, the only information I can give is negative, namely that amongst our 200 members which comprise the bulk of “T” owners in this country there are none owning a sporting adaptation as described.

One can only assume that none have survived.

Charles Pearce.
Registrar, Model-T Register.
St. Albans.

***
Sir,
I was interested in your June letter referring to “Special Ts” as my father had one. Having delved through some hundreds of old photographs I came across the enclosed, which will give some idea of what was done with a Ford Model-T in 1923. The original was a 1915 body and chassis.

This was constructed by a company called Crewford in Stock Orchard Street, off Caledonian Road, London. The chassis was modified using what was called “underslung” suspension. A R-R-type radiator as fitted and a polished aluminium bonnet (also R-R style), one-piece windscreen and a two-door body, wooden dash. All Ford centrols, hand-throttle and ignition and three foot controls were retained.

Fords in those days were easily distinguished by a distinctive rear axle. This was hidden by a tool box on the “Crewford”. This car having a heavy body was very slow—maximum speed with four adults probably being about 40 m.p.h. Nominal 22 h.p. engine.

It used to arouse great interest as curious persons would wonder what make it was—older readers of the 1920s well know the wide variety of “marques” available.

On one occasion when parked outside an hotel my father was astonished to see someone lying on the ground looking under the tool box to see the rear axle—though of course the wheels and hubs—plain and nickel-plated, would “give the show away”.

There was a “one-man hood” as opposed to the rather elaborate fitting on standard T, but no side curtains, so in inclement weather we were well “mackintoshed”. Incidentally, I possess the original registration paper—no log books in those days—for the car, issued by Herts. County Council, and a receipt for the annual tax of £6. 6. 0.

C. Spencer.
Battle.