Brighton Brevities

Author

W.B.

Browse pages

The most popular make was de Dion Bouton, with 38 examples entered, but a dozen Benz and eleven each of Humber or Humberette, Panhard-Levassor and Wolseley, and seven each of Oldsmobile, Peugeot and Renault.

*   *   *

It is pleasing that some “new” veterans competed. For instance, E. J. “Wasp” Moor bought his 1900 Benz only last year as scrap, and it was running, restored, for the first time since 1915. P. Newens’ 1904 Star was found buried at Ramsgate and has apparently only been on the road for about two years of its life, C. Smith’s 1903 Oldsmobile had lain derelict in a shed since 1910, being discovered in 1953 and run again for the first time last June, and the 1904 Peugeot driven by A. J. L. Evans was used to drive a band-saw in a builder’s yard for 26 years before being put back into working order.

*   *   *

Wilfred Andrews, Chairman of the R.A.C., drove a 1901 Benz and F. S. Bennett, President of the R.A.C., had a passenger in his “one owner from new” 1903 Cadillac. Col. A. E. Young, C.M.G., Commissioner of Police for the City of London, who must have been very proud of the traffic arrangements all along the route. The oldest car in the Run was the 1806 1½-h.p. Arnold dog-cart, believed to be the only vehicle still in working order which took part in the original 1896 Emancipation Ron.

*   *   *

Only seven veterans failed to arrive in time to qualify for the R.A.C. replica medals. Last to arrive within schedule was A. H. Wheeler’s 1902 Peugeot, which was pushed over the line with only seconds to spare.

*   *   *

2,500,000 people are estimated officially to have watched the Run.