THE M.G. MAGNETTE "N" -continued

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48

THE M.G. MAGNETTE “N “—continued.

As befits a car of high maximum speed, the brakes of the Magnette are extremely powerful and can cope with any situation within reason. Although there is no servo mechanism they are absurdly light in operation, and this may account for the curious absence of braking effect experienced by the driver. The car just pulls up, quickly and smoothly, even when they are applied vigorously. The effect on the passengers is usual in that they tend to pitch forward when dogs or jaywalkers wander off the pavement in their inimitably care-free fashion, but the driver does not notice anything untoward in the behaviour of the car.

A point which impressed us considerably was the silence of the engine. Exhaust note there is a-plenty, of course, but the engine itself is exceptionally quiet up to 4,000 r.p.m. Beyond this point a little of its normal smoothness is lost, and one becomes conscious of the source of one’s 65 m.p.h. gait. Higher up the range it becomes smooth once more, and 5,500 r.p.m. is easily and quickly reached on the gears, if required. The rev, counter, by the way, bears a green strip between 5,000 and 5,500 r.p.m., beyond which the dangerous red gives strident warning to over-exuberant drivers. At five o’clock we bid our friends goodbye, and set off to retrace our tracks to London. In the darkness our speed was rather slower than on the downward journey, speed which was not increased by the untimely, if conscientious indication by an arm of the law that a sidelamp had burnt out. For the illumination provided by the Rotax equipment we have nothing but praise, and a fast cruising speed is made possible. Local fog was dealt with satisfactorily by the special lamp on the dumb irons, and on coming

traffic was put at ease by the handilyplaced dimming switch.

And so back to London once more, having covered close on 400 miles on as short a day as the English winter can provide. The only one of the party who felt at all weary was the passenger in the back seat, and his troubles were mostly caused by a suppressed desire to be at the wheel himself—a course which the exigencies of insurance did not allow. By the grace of the M.G. Company we used the Magnette for many more days, and for this we find it difficult to place

thanks before reproach—so fond did we become of our willing steed. It was with a grudging heart, indeed, that we motored along the familiar road to Abingdon. A drenching downpour had brought to our notice yet another asset of the Magnette, to wit, a snug hood and all-weather equipment. Here, we reflected, is the ideal small car ; small enough to be economical and handy in traffic, yet possessing roomy coachwork and ample headroom when the hood is erected. At the price of £335 it will meet the requirements of the most fastidious.

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