The great VW mystery

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Sir,

With reference to the VW advert “The One that Got Away,” I think your suggestion that model cars were used is correct, considering the following points:

(a) The shadow of the top car is almost square, whereas that of the lower two are at a much steeper angle. This would suggest a lamp as a source of light, as the sun being so distant would not cause such a variation.

(6) The shadows are very long suggesting that the sun has only just risen. If this were the case, surely the houses would cast shadows reaching to the road. If this were not the case the houses would have to be far back, in which case the width of the gardens would surely be wider than one car.

(e) The road is too wide!!

(c1) Seems strange no vehicle has passed down the road since the snow, eg. milk van.

(s) Car was parked straight onto the kerb yet the front wheel tracks only appear from a yard out. If as Mr. Cheese suggests, this is due to the front being lifted out, etc., footprints would appear at the space front and rear of the departed car.

(f) It seems strange that all the cars should be parked on the right-hand side on the road and that the departing VW drove down the right-hand side ot the road. Presumably the photograph is meant to be in England as the windscreens are cleaned on the right side.

(g) All the drivers must be trying to start their cars simultaneously, as there are only one set of footprints leading to each car, ie. they are still trying to start them.

Richard Manning. Sale.

Sir,

Your correspondent, Mr. Cheese, has not considered the direction of the sun. The wheel tracks that can be seen are those which are at an angle to the sun’s rays and it is the shadow in the tracks which is visible, not the tracks themselves. The front wheel tracks are parallel to the rays and therefore have no shadow in them. This realised, the advertisement makes sense.

AM Rudd. London, NW5.

[Verily, the spirit of Sherlock Holmes lives on !—Ed.]