LETTERS FROM READERS, March 1930

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LI-4:FTERS FROM READERS Letters from readers on any subject are always welcome Ind they should be as brief as possible.

Sports Cars in the I.O.M.

SIR,

I cannot remember having seen in your columns mention of the time taken by ordinary sports cars to complete the Isle of Man T.T. course. Last year I noticed cars being used to open and close the roads for practising, but never heard if any times for the circuit had been taken. In a large car, stopping to open and shut the mountain gates, I was able to get round in 45 minutes, and am wondering whether this would be considered good. for a car.

Being one of the younger generation of motorists, I cannot remember much of the car T.T. races, and suggest that an article on this subject would be of general interest. Incidently, are three litre Sunbeams still in production ? After their wonderful successes in the past, it is strange that the type should be allowed to lapse.

AJAX.

Doncaster.

The three-litre Sunbeam is still listed by the manufacturers.—En.

Irish Grand Prix Rules.

SIR,

There have been rumours that two seater cars would be allowed to compete at Phoenix Park this year, and though no confirmation of this seems to have appeared in the Press, there is much to be said for the suggestion.

The International Regulations compel the fitting of a fourseater body to ears taking part in road races, but what is the point of this proviso ? Surely the cars taking part do not pretend to be touring cars in the full sense of the word, but if this is so, why cannot a two-seater be equally well a touring car ? Any discrepancy in the weights of the bodies could be made up by ballast carried by the two seaters.

If the Dublin authorities sanction the entry of two-seater cars, I hope we may see the Mercedes SS/K performing, as well as other cars unfortunately prevented from entering by their chassis only being suitable for two-seater bodies.

AMIL.

Southampton.

The 41Litre Bentley.

SIR,

While agreeing with the policy outlined in A. ‘L’s letter in your February number, may I bring forward the good points of the 4f-litre Bentley ? I have had considerable experience of the 3-litre model, and found that while 85 m.p.h. was available under favourable con

ditions, a good distance was required in which to attain this speed. With _my 4i-litre I can exceed 90 on several parts of the Oxford High Wycombe road and can attain that figure in quite a short time.

The extra length of chassis means that passengers in the rear seats have reasonable accommodation while the cornering is little if any worse than the shorter car.

I am tired of hearing that the new six cylinder X runs down to 5 m.p.h. on top gear ; what I like is a car that doesn’t get excited when doing over 70 m.p.h., and the 3.5 top gear ensures “that restful feeling,” at high speed.

The only complaint I have is against the coachwork. Wings seem to get loose sooner than they should and the cellulose soon lost its showroom finish, but for the man who likes driving his car hard without ill effects the 4f has everything to recommend it. SATISFIED. Oxford.

Light Planes on Test.

SIR,

As a reader of MOTOR SPORT in its old form and new, I welcome the inclusion of articles on light aeroplanes. Many owners of sports cars look forward to the time when they can own a machine of their own, but like myself have not acquired a knowledge of different types. I hope that during the coming season you will review the different English and foreign machines as was done with the Klemm in the February issue, so that prospective owners may see the various makes available. Perhaps we may hope for something approaching a road test, where such figures as maximum speed, range, and weight carrying capacity will appear.

L. C. SMITH.

Hampstead.

Artick s dealing with different makes of light aircraft will appear in MOTOR SPORT at regular intervals.—ED.

An Outboard Query.

SIR,

I have been much interested by the articles on “Speed Boat Design,” and wish I were in a locality suitable for the type of craft suggested. Unfortunately in this neighbourhood we are not favoured by stretches of sheltered water, and so a stouter boat would have to be used in the interests of safety.

A friend has offered me a sound fifteen foot rowing boat with transom stern, and I am wondering what sort of result could be expected from fitting a powerful engine such as the Elto Quad. This suggestion may amuse your readers who are accustomed to skim about on the sheltered waters of reservoirs, but I do not care to risk my life on a converted egg box for the sake of a few extra m.p.h. Any information on performance and the effect of high powered motors on displacement boats would be most welcome.

J. WILKINSON.

Isle of Man.

Two Stroke Areo Engines.

SIR,

As one who has had a considerable amount of experience with 2-stroke motor cycles over a period of years, I am puzzled to know why this type of engine finds so little favour as a power unit for small aeroplanes, as it seems to me that its attributes of simplicity and smooth running make it highly suitable for such work.

Motorists who are strong ” anti-2-stroke ” complain that its one bad feature is its poor speed range and uneven running at low speed. One will admit that the 2-stroke is not as good as the 4-stroke in this respect but the requirements of an aero engine do not call for this quality of super-flexibility, so one cannot imagine that this is the reason for its being ignored by the aircraft world ; nor can it be on account of any question of cooling, for in the air an air-cooled engine is running under ideal conditions.

The performances set up by the modern valveless motorcycle engine show that it is capable of being run on full throttle over long periods without any undue trouble. Surely, therefore, with its simplicity, its stamina and its even torque the 2-stroke should be worth while developing for aeroplane work, especially as it should be considerably cheaper to produce than the complicated multi-cylindered 4-stroke of medium power.

J.M.

London, S.W.7.

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