Flying Scotsman

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Current page

125

Current page

126

Current page

127

Current page

128

Current page

129

Current page

130

Current page

131

Current page

132

Current page

133

Current page

134

Current page

135

Current page

136

Current page

137

Current page

138

Current page

139

Current page

140

Current page

141

Current page

142

Current page

143

Current page

144

Current page

145

Current page

146

Current page

147

Current page

148

Current page

149

Current page

150

Current page

151

Current page

152

Current page

153

Current page

154

Current page

155

Current page

156

Current page

157

Current page

158

Current page

159

Current page

160

Current page

161

Current page

162

Current page

163

Current page

164

Current page

165

Current page

166

Current page

167

Current page

168

Current page

169

Current page

170

Current page

171

Current page

172

Current page

173

Current page

174

Current page

175

Current page

176

Current page

177

Current page

178

Current page

179

Current page

180

Current page

181

Current page

182

Current page

183

Current page

184

Current page

185

Current page

186

Current page

187

Current page

188

Current page

189

Current page

190

Current page

191

Current page

192

Current page

193

Jim Clark wasn’t just a master behind the wheel, his chief mechanic tells Rob Widdows

Jim Endruweit was Jim Clark’s chief mechanic. Life in the Grand Prix pitlane doesn’t get much better than that. Very few of these guys get to work with the Gods.

Jim went to Team Lotus in 1958 and stayed for 10 years, becoming chief mechanic on the Grand Prix cars at the team’s new race shop in Hethel. He thinks back over four decades, happy to share some memories of one of the true greats of Grand Prix racing. Jim was a huge fan of Jimmy Clark, as were all the Lotus mechanics.

“He was just such a nice guy,” smiles Jim, “and they’d all give their eye teeth to work for him. Jimmy made it all so easy – he was a thinker, and he knew what he wanted from the car. He had this tremendous natural ability, he could drive anything. I remember that at Rouen there was some event going on for veteran cars and one of the owners asked Jimmy if he’d like to give this old car [ERA ‘Remus’] a try. He’d never even seen the car before but within three laps he was miles faster than the owner had ever been. And the car wasn’t even sweating, you know. He could simply race anything.”

The bond between Clark and Colin Chapman was a key factor in the success of Team Lotus. They were very close.

“Yes, Jimmy was not very good at describing exactly what the car was doing,” says Jim.

“But Colin could always interpret what he was trying to say. It was a tremendous thing to see, this communication between them; they could sort things out almost without talking. They had this special bond and it made everything that much easier. When Trevor Taylor joined the team Jimmy would always help get the car sorted. He was a nice lad, Trevor, but the old man would ask Jimmy to do a few laps in his car if there were problems in practice or something.”

Jim remembers a race at the Nürburgring as one of the finest examples of Clark’s God-given ability.

“He was on the front row, with Gurney, Hill and Surtees, but he fluffed the start. He forgot to switch the fuel pump on and stalled it, getting away last. But he made up so much ground over those long laps, catching the leading bunch every time round, until there was hardly a gap to Gurney, Hill and Surtees. It was incredible, with the rain and fog, but it was a proper track and he had it taped. Then suddenly he wasn’t getting any closer. Afterwards I asked him what happened. ‘I got it sideways and slid all the way down the road so I decided to settle for fourth,’ he said. That was Jimmy, always a thinker. He could lose a lap and still win, and I remember him doing that at Monza.”

But not all his fondest memories are from the circuits.

“I used to fly with Jimmy in his Twin Commanche and he flew like he drove – very calmly, nothing showy, no excitement. But on one trip we were landing at a military airbase in Germany, and suddenly there was all this shouting over the radio, and it didn’t sound good. So we kept flying straight and then we saw a bunch of Starfighters heading for our runway. We watched them come in, then over the radio came ‘yes, Mr Clark, come in now, please,’ and Jimmy just landed very calmly, no fuss. That was him.”

Jim, like all the Scot’s mechanics, loved not only Clark the racer, but also the man.

“He was one of nature’s gentlemen,” says Jim. “He hardly ever raised his voice and he never threw his weight about. He inspired such great loyalty in everyone who worked for him; the lads would do anything for him, whatever it took. There’d be another all-nighter, but nobody complained if it was for Jimmy. We knew he’d probably go out and win the race on the Sunday.”
Everybody loves a winner, especially mechanics.

Jim Endruweit joined Lotus in 1958 and became one of Colin Chapman’s most trusted men, rising to the post of chief mechanic and then engineering director. Jim is now happily retired and still lives in Norfolk.