EDITORIAL THE VOGUE OF THE SPORTS CAR, November 1932

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EDITORIAL. THE VOGUE OF THE SPORTS CAR,

/ T is an admitted fact that in many aspects of auto mobile design European manufacturers have in the

last few years adopted ideas which have been, in common use in the U.S.A. for some time. More so has this been the case in coachwork, for although at one time the two continents had completely different views on this subject, many European cars nowadays closely resemble in coachwork the recognised American standard of lines.

This transition has given cause to considerable apprehension in the minds of sporting motorists that the open touring car, and finally the sports car, will one day become impracticable as a commercial proposition, and that we shall become a nation of saloon motorists, with our sole outlet for sporting propensities in a large-engined 2-seater roadster. Any such fears must have been readily exorcised by a visit to the 1932 Olympia Motor Exhibition, for we do not remember ever seeing so many sports cars on exhibitors’ stands in pre

vious years. In actual fact 24 out of 51 motorcar manufacturers displayed Cars which could be classified as being of a sporting nature. And to this figure, of course, should be added such names as Frazer Nash, A.C., Vale Special, and the new sports V.8 Ford models which were not shown at Olympia. . All this is most encouraging to those of us who have done everything in their Power to popularise the

sports car in this country. Motoring can be dismissed as merely a means of transport from one point to another— by a passenger. But to a driver who has once tasted the thrill of handling a vehicle in which the lessons of roadholding, steering, braking and engine power learnt by racing have been incorporated, cannot fail to appreciate the charm of motoring at its best, and will not be content with “just a motor-car.” It is possible that this vogue in the popularity of the sports car will not be met with approval in all quarters, for the sporting motorist has occasionally been held up to the public eye as the arch Road-Hog, and a Menace to Mankind. It is only natural that there should exist a small number of sports car drivers who are regrettably lacking in a sense of responsibility to other road users. There will always be black sheep in every fold. But it is an undoubted fact that the possession of a sports car, with all its racing attri butes, encourages its owner to become thoroughly pro

brakes, make an intelligent driver of a high efficiency sports car probably the safest user of the highway today.

The sports car vogue is a very real move in the direction of safer roads. ficient in handling his car in all circumstances. The expert use of indirect gears which minimises the potentially dangerous moment of passing a large slower moving vehicle, in conjunction with a responsive engine, accurate steering, good road holding, and powerful