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Sir,

In. common with all enthusiasts of my acquaintance, I rejoice exceedingly that you have decided to carry on. You ask for topics of interest to readers, and I beg to tell you of a machine which usually finds little space in your paper. I write out of no desire to see myself in print, but solely to bring to the notice of enthusiasts a car after their own hearts. I refer to the three-wheeler Morgan. After a long apprenticeship on motor-cycles, force of circumstances forced me, a little while ago, to look for a motor car with the following characteristics : (a) First-class road-holding ; (b) High-geared and accurate steering; (;) Low tax and petrol consumption ; (d) A high cruising speed ; (e) Moderate first cost ; (/) Complete enjoyment of motoring After much head scratching, I made enquiries about the Morgan. At once a maelstrom of protest came from kind friends. ” They turn over as soon as look at you,” “A hand throttle is useless,” ” Hopeless—a blacksmith’s job,” were but a few of the comments poured forth. For a while I waited, then finally,

decided to plunge. For 170 I got a 1935 car, water-cooled, and have never regretted the step. It has the good old ” big-twin ” characteristics, will do an honest 70-75, and cruise at 65 all day long without coming near its peak revs. Once you have mastered the knack, the roadholding and steering are extraordinary. I can imagine nothing less likely to capsize on corners. Once, caught by the falling dusk, I had to make Bournemouth by “blackout ” time. Starting from Southampton, I shall never I orget that rim across the New Forest. It was an ” eye-opener ” on the subject of speed hi safety. At 60 m.p.h. and upwards an uncanny change seems to come over the car, all the low-speed harshness of suspension disappears, and the car seems literally glued to the road, and, believe me, tucked away in that tiny cockpit, with the ” big-twin ” barking beautifully, and with the wind tugging at your hair and “outside ” sleeve, there is little to touch it

for unadulterated joy. Of course, the proximity to the ground assists the impression, but even so, it is very real.

Quite frankly, there are snags. The braking could be better, and the hand throttle and high-geared navigation take practice, but it is very easy to convert to foot throttle and coupled brakes, a job which I am at present undertaking. Perhaps the greatest joy of all, however, is the enthusiasm amongst the band of Morgan owners. Never do you pass one on the road without a colossal display of “thumbs up” and waving, the usual precedure, apparently, being to nearly fall out of your seat in delight at another enthusiast passing.

You will of course appreciate that I write as a genuine admirer of Morgan products, and am not in any way connected with them. I do feel however, that your readers, who may require a similar motor to myself, might like to know how delighted I am with my own. Tax (next year) .15, petrol constunption 50 m.p.g., dropping to 40 m.p.g. if you cruise fast, is surely an attractive proposition these days. With best wishes to your paper. I am, Yours etc., C. L. DEP/SHAW

Southbourne, Hants.

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