No Sunday Grand Prix

No Sunday Grand Prix

Sir,

I feel that I must come to the 'support of the 1975 British Grand Prix. I, like most of the spectators there, was disappointed by the premature end to the race, and I suppose that the ending is the thought that sticks in one's mind more easily than does the thoughts about the rest of the race, but what a race it was up to that point. There were many changes of leader, much skilled driving during thy first wet period; who will forget the roar as Regazzoni went into the lead, or Pryce or Hunt; and what about Jody Scheckter's driving when he had the proper tyres in the first wet period, and when he changed back to dries. It was an inconclusive ending, but surely not the complete shambles which your excellent magazine reports that it was. May I also make a plea through the columns of your magazine that Brands Hatch is not allowed to run next year's Grand Prix on a Sunday. There are many people, myself included, who would be unable to attend because the complete day that is demanded if you are to get full value for your money from

the Grand Prix is impossible for those people whose first duty is to be in Church on a Sunday. Chichester DAVID FISHER [I am pleased to print this letter and sincerely hope that Webb will arrange the Grand Prix for Saturday. 55 years ago and many times since I have been derided for stating that the gradual introduction of a Continental Sunday would do nothing but harm and finally bring us down to Continental standards. The Empire has gone, the standards are down, dismally down, at work, at play, and morally, and our influence in world affairs practically gone. The Christian Socialists who formed the Independent Labour Party would break their hearts to see the mob operating their Party today.— Managing Director.1