Sir,

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* * * Sir,

I am the owner of a late 1951 Light Fifteen Citroen having a mileage on the clock comparable to that of Mr. McGrath’s car. Unlike him, however, I have not to date spent nearly so much in maintenance in spite of driving nearly everywhere as hard as practieable. Possibly this is due to really trying to adhere to the instructions given on frequency of lubrication, which certainly requires an effort. I find, too, that starting in any weather is instantaneous if the electrical side also receives its fair share of maintenance.

I agree that the car is not worth the money—what car is today ? On my car the paintwork is bad, the chromium appalling. Further, I agree that the car is rough, has few refinements, and possesses (1951 model) a luggage locker which is a mockery. However, I am still a Citroen “fan” for a reason which Mr. McGrath possibly does not appreciate, namely, that it is one of the few cars into which a 6 ft. 3 in. body, having 50 per cent, of its length as leg, can fit directly into the driving seat, without having previously torn the latter out by the roots and added to the steering column length. Relieve me, there arc not many other similar-sized cars available in this country to which this applies in spite of your wide benchseats and bulbous bodywork.

Wear on tyres can be related directly to percentage of life on the front wheels. My worst figure so far obtained is 5,000 miles odd on a tyre 100 per cent. on the front, but admittedly this particular tyre always looked “soft ” in spite of frequent cheekiug for correct pressure. My best figure on an original tyre still on the car is 20,000. of which 25 per cent, of its life only has been on the front. Frequent attention to tyre pressures is necessary, and I find best results are obtained from slightly harder than the officially quoted figures.

Gear ratios in a three-speed gearbox are, of necessity, widely spaced in a comparatively low-powered car, and the change from second to first requires a skill which in the early ‘thirties was commonplace, but which now unfortunately is rarer due to the widespread use of modern aids such as synchromesh, which so helpfully conceals the ” margin of error” all too commonly present in the meshing of gears.

But for day-to-day travel to and from work, or on holiday, summer or winter, especially the latter with a nice smooth ice surface. the Citroen with a wheel at each corner and front-wheel drive gets me there economically and as fast, or faster, than the next man, with a lot of enjoyment thrown in.

I am, Yours, etc..

A. E. SAUNDERS. Uppingham.