October 1974

Page 21
Surface Mail: Home £3.60 Overseas £3.60 U.S.A. and Canada $9.00 Airmail: Europe £7.00 Middle East £10.00 Australasia £12.00 All other countries £11.00 All prices include postage
Matters of Moment ... 1055 The 45th Italian Grand Prix ... 1057 Reflections in the Italian Sunshine ... 1060 European Letter ... 1061 On Citroen ... 1064 Sports Round-Up ... 1068 Veteran—Edwardian—...
Belt-Up! As soon as the Election is over the busy-bodies will resume the campaign for compulsory seat belts. After all, the Civil Service treats drivers and motor-vehicle owners much the same...
Page 22
* Only clubs whose secretaries furnished the necessary information prior to the 14th of the preceding month are included In this list * C = Closed Event. CI = Closed Invitation Event. R = Restricted...
Page 23
Peterson keeps the faith again Monza, September 8th The cast for the last Grand Prix in Europe for 1974 was fairly stable, the only new car on the scene being a fourth BRM P201, which Pescarolo was...
Page 26
As I sat in the Press Tribune, high above the starting line, watching the cars assemble on the grid I thought back to 1957, when I had sat in the same place and watched three green cars and one red...
Page 27
[By means of which our roving European reporter keeps in touch with the Editor.] Dear W.B., The idea of holding a race or demonstration for old or historic cars before a Grand Prix event seems to be...
Page 30
In view of the fact that all the staff members of this magazine are admirers of Citroen advanced engineering, readers might find it surprising to learn that other than D.S.J.'s ultra-enthusiastic...
Page 34
Formula 5000 One International formula which seems to thrive on both sides of the Atlantic (as well as in Australia and New Zealand) is the Formula 5000 single-seater category, a class of racing...
Page 35
A section devoted to old car matters VSCC Thruxton Race Meeting (August 31st) Peter Morley (Bentley-Napier) Wins the Motor Sport Brooklands Memorial Trophy With the unavailability of Donington the...
Page 36
A prime specimen of the Silent-Knight species J. D. A. Thomas' 35/120 Daimler Limousine Sleeve-valve Daimlers in running order are almost defunct. When, many years back, I wanted to include one in...
Page 40
No.50: The Salmson With the excellent Salmson history by Chris Draper now published (it is reviewed elsewhere) it seems opportune to fill in with some fragments of the London side of this sporting...
Page 41
The Scripps-Booth Sir, I was most interested in the correspondence on old car matters in your June issue to notice mention of a Scripps-Booth car, owned by a military gentleman. There must have been...
Page 43
"The Salmson Story" by Chris Draper. 167 pp. 8 3/4 in. x 5 1/2 in. (David & Charles Ltd., South Devon House, Newton Abbot, Devon. £4.50.) This long-awaited explanation of what Salmson cars and...
Page 44
Reutemann all the way Osterreichring, Knittelfeld, August 18th There were quite a lot of changes to the Grand Prix scene in the lower echelons, caused by accident, changes of heart, re-organisations...
Page 46
When we arrived for the Austrian Grand Prix we received a very polite reprimand, worded in the nicest way, but nonetheless firm. It came from the Tourist Traffic Association of Knittelfeld and oddly...
Page 48
A fragment of the past in the modern world of British Leyland. With the introduction of their new Vanden Plas 1500, a replacement for the Vanden Plas 1300 based upon the Allegro, British Leyland...
Page 50
The Editor Asks the World's Most Prolific and Successful Record-Breaker Some Questions and Gets Some Very Interesting Answers A book would be needed to detail all the racing and record-breaking...
Page 53
Austin Sevens, Ford Eights and Tens were popular chassis for mounting special bodies upon until the advent of the Mini and other small, cheap cars took away the need for such makeshift substitutes...
Page 54
Total Rally It is our experience that people who have no first-hand knowledge of the continent of Africa frequently labour under grave misconceptions concerning its geography. A popular notion is...
Page 57
The Ferrari Dino 308 GT4 2+2 The Ferrari Dino 308 GT4, introduced last Autumn, is more than a big brother to the familiar, beautiful little 246GT. It is an entirely new car, the few things in common...
Page 61
The Austrian Grand Prix proved a start-to-finish victory for Carlos Reutemann's Brabham BT44, seen on the right leading Niki Lauda's Ferrari away from the Osterreichring starting grid. Second place...
Page 65
Ferrari fans left Monza highly disappointed after both 312B3s retired after leading. Right, Regazzoni (11) takes the lead from Lauda's smoking sister car just before the Austrian pulled in. The...
Page 67
The Matra-Simca team was on top form at the Ricard 1,000 Kms., penultimate round in the World Championship for Makes, taking the leading two places. Beltoise and Jarier (below) celebrate an easy...
Page 68
Roberts in his Lotus 16 (above) won the fastest race, virtually unchallenged. The Motor Sport Brooklands Memorial Trophy was presented by the Editor's wife, Mrs. Boddy, to the winner, Peter Morley (...
Page 71
The Maserati 450S was a spectacularly fast contender for major sports car championship honours when it arrived on the scene at the end of 1956, but a number of trifling failures and misjudgements...
Page 76
N.B.—Opinions expressed are those of our Correspondents and Motor Sport does not necessarily associate itself with them. - Ed. RAC Travel Service Sir, I would like to draw your readers' attention to...
Page 77
Designed by Engineers Sir, I have been an ardent Rover enthusiast for several years. This is probably a result of parental influence as my father owned two or three of the good old 'uns including a...
Page 78
Seat-belts Sir, I feel I must continue the seat belt controversy with my own experiences and views. Two years ago I rolled over an MG Midget at about 70 m.p.h. with my wife as passenger. Needless to...
Page 79
Your Own Life Sir, Whilst reading "Reflections in the Bourgogne" in the August issue of your most excellent magazine, I was greatly impressed by D.S.J.'s depressingly apt observations on the future...

Noticed a mistake on this page?

Tell Us About It