Moch Tutor

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Cones, cones and more cones. They seemed to fill even the vast glass expanses of the brand new S-class Mercedes limousine, twirling hither and thither as though an M25 madman had been given his head. Yet the apparently huge Mercedes whipped through them three seconds faster than I could manage in a manual 190E…

The occasion was a British edition of the Guido Moch safer driving school, tuition that normally costs £1000 and stretches over two days. Moch is Daimler-Benz’s long serving chief development driver, possibly the finest road driver in the world, certainly one of the most experienced in varied conditions. We experienced half a day in a bid to master the devilish intricacies of The Snake, Mickey Mouse, and various slaloms (from 20 to 90 mph), skid pad or wet avoidance/ABS braking courses. All featured cones and surfaces that varied from ice to nice. Just when you thought you had the hang of that, they threw in the popular film stunt of a full 360-degree turn in an automatic 190 (no handbrake, just steering lock and throttle).

Feeling smug, having set a few fastest times, despite using a different car for each trial? Then the Mercedes instructors have a final probe into your overall abilities. They stitch four of the key tests together at the Fen End Lucas test track outside Warwick. You are issued a two-litre 190E automatic and the watch starts ticking. Under pressure, your first job is a minor slalom to charge into a coned garage. Wrestle from drive to reverse and twirl the car from forward motion to a complete 360 degree spin and exit, with drive reselected.

Then it’s slalom time again — where do all these cones breed? Now charge into the maze they call Mickey Mouse, so intricate that you have to keep green colour cones right, standard issue red and white, left. Emerge dizzy and there is some serious top gear motoring to be done, a flat out right at 105/110 mph followed by a tightening left. The 90 mph chicane follows (superb in the V12 S-class, experienced earlier).

Then it is time to tackle half of a Snake track, one that places a premium on second gear slides to balance the car without braking. A fast exit here led to more 90-100 mph motoring, cleverly followed by the slippiest of final 35 mph braking manoeuvres into the final halt. I had been pipped until the final 10s, but my closest adversary clipped a cone and handed me victory; less than a second covered nearly four minutes’ exertion…

Those more seriously interested in having their chauffeurs trained to avoid terrorist attacks with the full Hockenheim or Stuttgart-based courses, or those who simply want to receive tuition of a type that does not exist in my UK experience, should apply to their local Mercedes-Benz dealer for further details. Meanwhile the quotes from Guido Moch abounded all day. I particularly liked: “We will never make a finer car than the S-class of today. The next car must be smaller, but for me this is the finest we ever made, because a comfortable driver is the safest driver. And no car provides more comfort and more response than the new S-class.”

That sounded contentious until I vainly tried to beat the S-class time through the tight slalom courses with a manual 190E. As we left, the good Guido quipped: “Drive only at 20 per cent under your personal limit, and that of your car.” He looked a bit dubious at this point. I had a BMW 318is Coupe to drive away in. I did so briskly, before any further comments were made. However, I would swear I could still hear their laughter, miles down the M40. J W