Articles tagged Air Force

Page 66 of March 1995 archive issue thumbnail Page 66, March 1995

"C G G" A Great Editor

I became aware of The Aeroplane (6d weekly) in the early 1930s and was soon a regular reader. It was edited by the controversial and outspoken Charles Grey Grey from 1911 to 1939, and was entertaining to a degree not approached by other technical journals. I became such an enthusiastic follower of CGG's writings that when I began to write for Motor Sport from 1935 onwards, and became its full-...

Page 17 of April 1941 archive issue thumbnail Page 17, April 1941

Club news

C. U. A. C. The Cambridge University Automobile Club's dinner of March 8th, so ably organised by J. B. Jesty, was highly successful. Forty-five persons attended, in spite of existing difficulties. Those who sat down to dinner were: Guests: Laurence Pomeroy, Gordon Wilkins, Anthony Heal and Arthur Hyde; Veteran Members: Michael May, D. B. Tubbs, Andrew Fairtlough, D. Hampshire, R. Habershon, A. J...

Page 14 of August 1941 archive issue thumbnail Page 14, August 1941

CARS I HAVE OWNED

CARS I HAVE OWNED [This contribution is especially interesting, being written by a young New Zealand reader, D. B. McLean, while he was on a ship bound for this country to serve with the R.A.F. In thanking him, we would also extend to him a warm welcome, in which readers will join. Incidentally, the Perry was the forerunner of the Bean, and Capt. Douglas once drove one.—Ed.] MY first motoring...

Page 93 of November 1984 archive issue thumbnail Page 93, November 1984

V-E-V Odds & Ends.

V-EN Odds & Ends.—. A reader, now in Hong Kong, wonders whether three cars he owned as a young Air Force Officer still exist. They were a 1934 Aston Martin, Reg. No. probably BLU 417, the ex-Stirling Moss 328 BMW, Reg. No. DPX 653, and a low-mileage LG6 Lagonda dh coupe, Reg. No. AST 2. Letters can be forwarded. The great-grandson of Thomas Dence, one-time Director of the Argyll Motor Company...

Page 8 of February 1940 archive issue thumbnail Page 8, February 1940

Club News

B.O.C. One club at least is not dead. The Bugatti Owners' Club managed to produce another excellently printed issue of "Bugantics" before Christmas, and we believe that there may be an informal meeting in town one night this month or next. It is particularly asked that members should continue to pay a £1 1s subscription while the war is on, so that Prescott may be preserved for the advent of...

Page 85 of July 2004 archive issue thumbnail Page 85, July 2004

At the coalface

William Boddy: Founder editor, 1936-present All was going well in 1939. Mr. Tee had acquired Speed, Motor Sport was the BRDC's official organ --- and then war broke out. Just as he was paying off the printers I convinced Mr Tee that we could carry on. "How would I fill the magazine if this war lasted for 10 years?", he asked. 'With history," I said. He recalled the production chaps, we cobbled up...

Page 76 of February 1995 archive issue thumbnail Page 76, February 1995

Readers' Letters

War-time Motor Sport Sir, In "Motoring Collector's Items" last month it is stated that the October 1939 issue of Motor Sport was printed without a cover and with only eight pages when paper suddenly became too precious a commodity. In fact it was rather more dramatic than that! The reason for no cover and only eight pages was that it been decided that there was no future for a sporting motor...

Page 78 of April 1983 archive issue thumbnail Page 78, April 1983

The Air Speed Record

Motoring enthusiasts should be conversant with the LSR, but are probably far less familiar with the ASR, if the World's Air Speed Record was ever thus condensed. So a short study of it may not come amiss. The LSR was of much interest, especially during the developing 1920s, when the newspaper-reading public was kept well aware of the activities of Sir Malcolm Campbell, Parry Thomas, Sir Henry...

Page 7 of October 1945 archive issue thumbnail Page 7, October 1945

Cars I Have Owned

This most interesting contribution to this series by Francis Kay recalls, in particular, those other gay if grim days just after the 1914-18 war. — Ed. Act one of the war with Germany finished in November, 1918, whereupon that form of business was suspended for 21 years. I selected a well-fitting bowler and, leaving the Air Force, went back to school for a time, i.e.. finished my apprenticeship....

Page 79 of June 1972 archive issue thumbnail Page 79, June 1972

Book reviews

"Flying Between the Wars", by Allen Wheeler. 199 pp. 9 1/2" x 6" (G. T. Foulis & Co., 50a, Bell Street, Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire. £3.85) I have remarked before, in these Book Review columns, that books about flying between the wars, especially in the RAF, have been all too few. Now Air Commodore Wheeler, well known to those who support the excellent work of the Shuttleworth Trust or who...

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